Audrey Singer

The surprising strength of the Latino vote in the 2012 presidential election has created an incentive for the Republican Party, poor performers with Latinos, to rethink their strategy for 2016. It’s also driving calls for change to the nation’s immigration laws. In the past week, lawmakers from both sides of the aisle have spoken publicly about the need for a comprehensive approach to immigration reform.  The focus remains on Latinos because they are expected to grow their number of voters by 40 percent, and the Pew Hispanic Center projects the Latino electorate will double in size by 2030. Pr

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Last week, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano announced big news: Effective immediately, eligible undocumented youth are granted deferred action from deportation (a form of administrative relief). This important and sensible step by the Obama administration provides immigrants under the age of 30 who have been in the United States for at least five years and are currently enrolled or have graduated from high school or have been honorably discharged from the U.S.

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It’s been five years since we seriously attempted to reform U.S.

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A more than 20-year old program, long underutilized, is slowly emerging as a potential lifeline for regional economic development for some metro areas and states at a time when traditional financing streams are running dry. The EB-5 Immigrant Investor Visa program—created as part of the Immigration Act of 1990—allocates 10,000 green cards per year to foreigners who invest $1 million (or $500,000 in a targeted employment area) in qualifying U.S.

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During economic hard times immigrants are often blamed for taking jobs away from U.S.-born citizens. This recession is no different in that regard. The many incendiary comments aimed at immigrants, especially those here illegally, bandied about the GOP primary reflect that as well. As job growth has picked up, however, a growing chorus of leaders is pushing for immigration policies that better meet economic demands and help the economy. Just how do immigrants fit into the U.S. labor market?

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This week, Congress took a small step in reforming America’s out-dated immigration system. In H.R.

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with Courtney Pitman Last week, the Obama administration announced that deportation proceedings would be suspended on a case-by-case basis for illegal immigrant youth that graduated high school and attended college or joined the military.

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New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is using $30 million of his own money--and a matching gift from George Soros--to help fund a new program aimed at addressing the vast socio-economic disparities between New York City’s young white men and those who are black or Latino. At a time when more people are out of work and municipal budgets are stretched thin, private philanthropy is increasingly important.  But it’s not just cities that need this kind of help.

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President Obama renewed a call for serious discussion about reforming the nation’s immigration laws in his speech yesterday in El Paso. He enlisted the American public to actively join the push to get Congress to move past the stalled debate and into action. One of the hurdles comprehensive reform faces is the varying impacts of immigration across the nation.

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 With President Obama in El Paso today to talk immigration and border security, I’ve taken New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s op-ed that appeared last week in the Wall Street Journal and rearranged selected parts into a poem. All words are still his. Like Emma Lazarus’s poem, “The New Colossus,” at the base of the Statue of Liberty, this one acknowledges the important role immigrants have in the identity of the United States and urges a welcoming stance on immigration. This poem, however, is designed to fit better with the economic moment and offers some immediate policy solutions.  An Ode to

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