David A. Bell

What the French Revolution can tell us about events in Crimea. 

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In the so-called “global turn” in contemporary historiography, it has not been enough simply to study the way Western powers have affected the rest of the world. The task has also been to show how the rest of the world affected the West. And it has been a matter of applying, even to quite distant historical periods, the controlling metaphor of the digital age: the “network.” Yet a remarkable amount is absent as well.

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Is War Civilized?

The Evolution of the Battlefield

Were princes more humanitarian than the Hague?

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The French public has recently been more inclined to a sense of decline, malaise, paralysis and crisis. And it is at least partially justified. 

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In France, apologizing for your country can be good politics. Maybe American presidents should give it a try?

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I. THEY ARE, in their very different ways, monuments of American civilization. The first is a building: a grand, beautiful Beaux-Arts structure of marble and stone occupying two blocks’ worth of Fifth Avenue in midtown Manhattan. The second is a delicate concoction of metal, plastic, and glass, just four and a half inches long, barely a third of an inch thick, and weighing five ounces. The first is the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, the main branch of the New York Public Library (NYPL). The second is an iPhone.

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He was a man who claimed to have abandoned all five of his children, as newborns, at the door of an orphanage. He broke with nearly every friend he ever made, including some who sacrificed dearly for him, denouncing them in the most hateful and vitriolic terms. He wrote that law-breakers deserved to be treated as rebels and traitors.

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He was a man who claimed to have abandoned all five of his children, as newborns, at the door of an orphanage. He broke with nearly every friend he ever made, including some who sacrificed dearly for him, denouncing them in the most hateful and vitriolic terms. He wrote that law-breakers deserved to be treated as rebels and traitors.

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The Conductor

In this new biography, Peter McPhee is quite right to point out that Robespierre was in no sense a pathological freak. He was perfectly capable of ord

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As the paperless future approaches, certain sorts of publications have inevitably moved into the all-digital realm faster than others. Most of us still prefer paper when it comes to beach novels, for instance, or the cherished volumes of our personal libraries. At the other extreme, scientific journals effectively went all-digital years ago, and thanks to GPS, maps and road atlases are quickly following.

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