Geoffrey Wheatcroft

Better Read Than Red

Infuriating and brilliant, the “New Statesman” turns 100

Infuriating and brilliant, the “New Statesman” turns 100.

READ MORE >>

The Importance of Being Prickly

How Margaret Thatcher ruled

How Margaret Thatcher ruled.

READ MORE >>

The Geopolitics of Cheating

Soccer's fixing epidemic is a symptom of a much bigger problem.

Soccer's fixing epidemic is a symptom of a much bigger problem.

READ MORE >>

The UK's accelerating drift from the EU.

READ MORE >>

Following the BBC Scandal, the NYT's new CEO--Mark Thompson, who previously ran the BBC--needs to go.

READ MORE >>

A trip to the site of one of the Great War's great disasters.

READ MORE >>

FOR ALL THE soccer played by Spain, and fine tennis at Wimbledon, something was ailing me this past month. It’s called Tour Fever. My promiscuous love for sports includes rugby (which I played a very long time ago), skiing (which I still relish as an aging downhill daredevil), and cricket (despite the English weather). For obscure reasons, I follow the Red Sox, with little joy at present, and thanks to the hospitality of the University of Texas, where I sometimes lecture, I consider myself a long-range Longhorns fan.

READ MORE >>

It’s over, and very fine it was, not to say awe-inspiring. I doubt whether Vicente del Bosque quite felt like like Sir Alex Ferguson after Manchester United annihilated Arsenal 8-2 the start of last season, “You don’t want to score any more,” but neither he or any of us can have guessed how one-sided the final would be. So formidable against Germany, Italy crumpled in the face of—what?

READ MORE >>

It’s over, and very fine it was, not to say awe-inspiring. I doubt whether Vicente del Bosque quite felt like like Sir Alex Ferguson after Manchester United annihilated Arsenal 8-2 the start of last season, “You don’t want to score any more,” but neither he or any of us can have guessed how one-sided the final would be. So formidable against Germany, Italy crumpled in the face of—what?

READ MORE >>

  Has this been the tournament of Euroredemption? It has been impossible to follow Euro 2012 unaware of political frissons, and the echoes of the other Euro, as the European Union undergoes its gravest crisis since Treaty of Rome in 1957. “Greece Leaves the Euro” was one cheeky London tabloid headline after the Greeks were beaten 4-2 (it had to be Germany who beat them).

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR