Isaac Chotiner

The easiest point to make about Tom Clancy, who died on Tuesday at the age of 66, is that he was a mediocre writer who penned books with noxious political messages. But he was more interesting than that, even if only as a totemic cultural figure. I haven't read any of his nonfictional output, which mostly deals with military matters, especially the physical details of American military hardware.

READ MORE >>

As everyone knows, when liberals are faced with rabid insanity they tend to look for root causes. Thus, I have embarked on a quest to find out why large elements of the Republican Party have completely lost their minds. One place I looked was Todd S.

READ MORE >>

Robert Baer is a former CIA case officer who served everywhere from Iraq to the former Soviet Union. (The 2005 film Syriana, starring George Clooney, was an adaptation of several of his books about the intelligence world.) Who better, then, to discuss Season 3 of “Homeland,” which premiered last night on Showtime? Every Monday, Baer and New Republic Senior Editor Isaac Chotiner will chat about the previous night’s episode. The conversations contain spoilers. 

READ MORE >>

In a strange and unconvincing essay in The New Yorker, Lee Siegel, who made his name as a slashing and smart critic (for a time at The New Republic), writes that he is through with negative book reviews. He mentions a Clive James essay from several months back which lamented the lack of nasty reviews in American publications.

READ MORE >>

In the last several weeks, people have started to question the supposed inevitability of Hillary Clinton as the next Democratic presidential nominee. First, Bill de Blasio won the New York mayoral primary, which appeared to signal rising anxiety about income inequality.

READ MORE >>

President Obama's unremarkable speech to the United Nations will probably be picked apart and analyzed for every word he uttered about Iran. But there was one particular formulation that caught my eye. Here was what he said: 

READ MORE >>

Frank Rich has a somewhat surprising essay in New York magazine in which he makes the case that Rand Paul has been an important and valuable presence in the Senate.

READ MORE >>

It has been a gruesome 48 hours. On Saturday, in Kenya, at least 68 people were slaughtered when gunmen from Somalia's Shahab extremist group entered a mall and started firing indiscriminately. (Or perhaps not entirely indiscriminately: The New York Times reports that witnesses claimed Muslims were told to run away). In Pakistan, at least 78 people were killed when suicide bombers attacked All Saints Church in the city of Peshawar.

READ MORE >>

John Gapper of The Financial Times has a story on Tina Brown which gives new meaning to the term "puff piece." The title, "Tina Brown Leaves Journalism in Her Wake," does an adequate job of summarizing the flavor of Gapper's article, which essentially views journalism as a once-noble profession that will now be without its leading light.

READ MORE >>

Rare is the occasion when you can invoke Munich without embarrassment. Indeed, it is probably fair to say that although the Munich Agreement was signed only 75 years ago this month, it has nevertheless been the most overused analogy in human history. The problems with deploying it to make an argument about current events are numerous. A few of them:1. Very few political movements are as bad as Nazism.2. Just because you are dealing with bad people doesn't mean military force is the answer.

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR