Jonathan Cohn

Senior Editor

Parent Trap

Jon Cohn on how Mitt Romney un-became his father.

READ MORE >>

The warnings went out in a 2004 company newsletter: Watch out for "ascruffy guy in a baseball cap." The scruffy guy was Michael Mooreand the company was pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline, whoseexecutives had gotten wind of Moore's new project: a documentaryabout the health care system called Sicko. The executives figuredit was only a matter of time before Moore showed up on theirdoorstep, camera in hand--if he hadn't already.

READ MORE >>

Race Debating

Thursday night's Democratic presidential debate revealed about as much as the previous ones did--which is to say, not that much. Eight candidates shared the stage at Howard University, for an exchange that lasted only an hour--in part because the opening formalities inexplicably soaked up nearly 20 minutes of air time. And it wasn't even an exchange per se. Instead, after each question, each candidate got a turn to answer, making for a tedious and rushed dialogue.

READ MORE >>

Chip Off

In the last 30 years or so, few arguments have hindered liberalism more than the charge that government programs are miserable failures. And it is true: Some government programs really have turned out pretty badly. Building colossal concrete housing projects and then filling them exclusively with very poor people, for example, didn't turn out to be such a hot idea. But it's become harder to make such arguments recently, since the federal government has junked a lot of those less successful programs while concentrating on new, more promising initiatives.

READ MORE >>

In Iowa on Tuesday, when Senator Barack Obama gave a speech about health care, he started by introducing Amy Chicos and telling her story. It seems that Amy and her husband, Lane, run a small business providing broadband Internet access to their small town. Twenty years ago, Lane was diagnosed with cancer--and ended up losing a lung, a leg bone, and part of his hip. He's in complete remission now, which is the good news. But, as a cancer survivor, he has sky high insurance premiums. The Chicos now pay 40 percent of their income for health insurance.

READ MORE >>

Hillary was Right

More than a dozen years later, Hillary Clinton wants the world to know that she has seen the error of her ways. That health care plan--the one that was supposed to revolutionize the medical industry and guarantee every American insurance--wasn't such a hot idea after all. "I think that both the process and the plan were flawed," Clinton admitted in an interview with The New York Times, demonstrating a level of contrition more fitting for an Iraq war architect.

READ MORE >>

More than a dozen years later, Hillary Clinton wants the world toknow that she has seen the error of her ways. That health careplan--the one that was supposed to revolutionize the medicalindustry and guarantee every American insurance--wasn't such a hotidea after all. "I think that both the process and the plan wereflawed," Clinton admitted in an interview with The New York Times,demonstrating a level of contrition more fitting for an Iraq wararchitect. "We were trying to do something that was very hard to do,and we made a lot of mistakes." A lot of people will hear that and nod in agreement.

READ MORE >>

Wading Pool

In Iowa on Tuesday, when Senator Barack Obama gave a speech about health care, he started by introducing Amy Chicos and telling her story. It seems that Amy and her husband, Lane, run a small business providing broadband Internet access to their small town. Twenty years ago, Lane was diagnosed with cancer--and ended up losing a lung, a leg bone, and part of his hip. He's in complete remission now, which is the good news. But, as a cancer survivor, he has sky high insurance premiums. The Chicos now pay 40 percent of their income for health insurance.

READ MORE >>

Mark Schmitt humbly begins his essay by confessing that he has worked on just one presidential campaign. Well, I can top that: I haven't worked on any! And while I've certainly covered my share of campaigns as a reporter, I'll confess that my expertise is in policy, not politics. On questions of campaign strategy, I'd typically defer to Mark's wisdom, which I believe to be considerable. That's particularly true on an issue like health care, which experience has shown to be so treacherous politically. And I suspect we share at least some common ground--more, at least, than he might realize.

READ MORE >>

Last month the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) issued an ultimatum to the Democrats running for president: Issue detailed plans for universal health care by August 1. Or else. OK, it wasn't quite that dramatic. There was no threat of specific reprisals against candidates who fail to meet the deadline.

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR