Jonathan Cohn

Senior Editor

A few hundred dollars a year. Maybe more than a thousand. Rex Delph really couldn't be certain how much larger his medical bills would be if his employer, the school board of Knox County, Tennessee, decided to swap health insurance plans. All Delph knew was that even a modest increase could end up financially overwhelming him.The problem for Delph wasn't so much his own medical bills. The 45-year-old school electrician was in relatively good health, except for a hernia that doctors said he could live with as long as he watched his diet.

READ MORE >>

Crash Course

The danger of consumer-driven health care.

READ MORE >>

Trailer Trash

Recent headlines have offered hope that President Bush may yet do right by the victims of Hurricane Katrina. After the first days of shameful ineptitude, he secured more than $60 billion in relief, named somebody with actual disaster experience to head the Federal Emergency Management Agency (fema), and, rather uncharacteristically, admitted his administration made serious errors in the storm's immediate aftermath. But there is one reason to think the Bush administration hasn't learned from its past mistakes: its plan for housing the people that Katrina has rendered homeless.

READ MORE >>

Martial Flaw

From the day Cindy Sheehan, mother of a fallen American soldier, began her vigil in Crawford, Texas, President Bush left the job of attacking her to his henchmen in the Republican Party and his sycophants in the press. Instead, Bush has largely confined himself to one modest, respectful response: that Sheehan's opposition to the war in Iraq is a relatively lonely one within the military community. "I met with a lot of families," Bush explained at a late August press conference. "She doesn't represent the view of a lot of the families I have met with."Bush may be right about that.

READ MORE >>

Pick and Lose

Has any word done more to cloak the modern conservative agenda than "choice"? As President Bush and Republican congressional leaders regularly remind us, Social Security privatization would give workers investment choices, school vouchers would give parents education choices, and Medicare privatization would give retirees health care choices. All of this is technically true: Social Security privatization, for example, really would present new opportunities for investing retirement savings.

READ MORE >>

Pick and Lose

Has any word done more to cloak the modern conservative agenda than "choice"? As President Bush and Republican congressional leaders regularly remind us, Social Security privatization would give workers investment choices, school vouchers would give parents education choices, and Medicare privatization would give retirees health care choices. All of this is technically true: Social Security privatization, for example, really would present new opportunities for investing retirement savings.

READ MORE >>

Body Politics

A pizza delivery car cruises down a leafy suburban street as a man in a black overcoat and a red power tie scampers after it, waving a piece of paper. "Trial lawyers used to only chase ambulances," explains a voice-over. "Now they're chasing restaurant deliveries to cash in on obesity."Even if you haven't seen this advertisement, you may understand the message. Over the last few years, attorneys have been filing lawsuits on behalf of obese consumers, claiming that restaurants and the food industry should be held legally responsible for making people fat.

READ MORE >>

A pizza delivery car cruises down a leafy suburban street as a man in a black overcoat and a red power tie scampers after it, waving a piece of paper. "Trial lawyers used to only chase ambulances," explains a voice-over. "Now they're chasing restaurant deliveries to cash in on obesity."Even if you haven't seen this advertisement, you may understand the message. Over the last few years, attorneys have been filing lawsuits on behalf of obese consumers, claiming that restaurants and the food industry should be held legally responsible for making people fat.

READ MORE >>

Going to the Matt

So this is how serious the controversy over Karl Rove has gotten for the White House: On Monday, Press Secretary Scott McClellan actually had to dodge a question from Fox News. It came from correspondent Carl Cameron: “Does the president continue to have confidence in Mr. Rove?” Relatively speaking, it was one of the softer inquiries McClellan fielded in an ugly briefing that Washington Post columnist Dana Milbank described as “perhaps the worst” of McClellan’s two-year tenure.

READ MORE >>

Health Inspection

Poor Wal-Mart is feeling a little bit, well, picked upon. Sure, the company just generated $285 billion in sales and $10 billion in profits. And, yes, it is rapidly expanding into such far-flung places as China. But, here in the United States, Wal-Mart's growth plans have suddenly run into political opposition from labor unions and liberal politicians--who, according to the company, aren't being fair.While critics have long attacked Wal-Mart for everything from destroying mom- and-pop stores to exploiting cheap foreign labor, the focus of the present controversy is health insurance.

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR