Jonathan Cohn
Senior Editor

Pelosi's pet issue.; Private Lesson
November 20, 2006

`This vote was stolen from us by the Republicans," seethed HouseMinority Leader Nancy Pelosi following passage of President Bush'sMedicare drug benefit in November 2003. She was referring to theegregious effort by the GOP leadership to keep the vote open untilthey achieved a majority--three hours of browbeating, arm-twisting,and even alleged bribery that culminated in a razor-thin victory inthe wee small hours of the night.

The Golden Ticket
August 14, 2006

The fairy tale began to unravel in the most unlikely of locations: The electronics aisle at Target. It was late September, the day after the Anderson family, as they had come to be known, first made their journey from a shelter in Houma, Louisiana, to a home in Kalamazoo, Michigan. The family, all of them refugees from Hurricane Katrina, had relocated to the Midwest at the invitation of a Catholic church group based in Kalamazoo.

Shrug Coverage
January 30, 2006

It was not so long ago that President Bush was bragging about his Medicare reform law, which gives senior citizens the opportunity to buy private insurance that will help pay for their prescriptions: "The days of low-income seniors having to make painful sacrifices to pay for their prescription drugs are now coming to an end." But somebody forgot to tell the old folks in Maine about this legislative miracle. On January 3, two days after the Bush initiative went into effect, the state's assistance hotline logged 18,000 calls.

Neoliberal utopia awaits.
January 01, 2006

`If you want a lower standard of living," conservative policy experts Grace-Marie Turner and Robert Moffit wrote in an op-ed last week, "the Europeans have the right prescription." The topic of discussion was universal health care, but it just as easily might have been government-sponsored child care or generous unemployment benefits.

The danger of consumer-driven health care.
November 07, 2005

A few hundred dollars a year. Maybe more than a thousand. Rex Delph really couldn't be certain how much larger his medical bills would be if his employer, the school board of Knox County, Tennessee, decided to swap health insurance plans. All Delph knew was that even a modest increase could end up financially overwhelming him.The problem for Delph wasn't so much his own medical bills. The 45-year-old school electrician was in relatively good health, except for a hernia that doctors said he could live with as long as he watched his diet.

Crash Course
November 07, 2005

The danger of consumer-driven health care.

Trailer Trash
September 26, 2005

Recent headlines have offered hope that President Bush may yet do right by the victims of Hurricane Katrina. After the first days of shameful ineptitude, he secured more than $60 billion in relief, named somebody with actual disaster experience to head the Federal Emergency Management Agency (fema), and, rather uncharacteristically, admitted his administration made serious errors in the storm's immediate aftermath. But there is one reason to think the Bush administration hasn't learned from its past mistakes: its plan for housing the people that Katrina has rendered homeless.

Martial Flaw
September 12, 2005

From the day Cindy Sheehan, mother of a fallen American soldier, began her vigil in Crawford, Texas, President Bush left the job of attacking her to his henchmen in the Republican Party and his sycophants in the press. Instead, Bush has largely confined himself to one modest, respectful response: that Sheehan's opposition to the war in Iraq is a relatively lonely one within the military community. "I met with a lot of families," Bush explained at a late August press conference. "She doesn't represent the view of a lot of the families I have met with."Bush may be right about that.

Pick and Lose
August 29, 2005

Has any word done more to cloak the modern conservative agenda than "choice"? As President Bush and Republican congressional leaders regularly remind us, Social Security privatization would give workers investment choices, school vouchers would give parents education choices, and Medicare privatization would give retirees health care choices. All of this is technically true: Social Security privatization, for example, really would present new opportunities for investing retirement savings.

Pick and Lose
August 22, 2005

Has any word done more to cloak the modern conservative agenda than "choice"? As President Bush and Republican congressional leaders regularly remind us, Social Security privatization would give workers investment choices, school vouchers would give parents education choices, and Medicare privatization would give retirees health care choices. All of this is technically true: Social Security privatization, for example, really would present new opportunities for investing retirement savings.

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