Jonathan Cohn
Senior Editor

Pick and Lose
August 29, 2005

Has any word done more to cloak the modern conservative agenda than "choice"? As President Bush and Republican congressional leaders regularly remind us, Social Security privatization would give workers investment choices, school vouchers would give parents education choices, and Medicare privatization would give retirees health care choices. All of this is technically true: Social Security privatization, for example, really would present new opportunities for investing retirement savings.

Pick and Lose
August 22, 2005

Has any word done more to cloak the modern conservative agenda than "choice"? As President Bush and Republican congressional leaders regularly remind us, Social Security privatization would give workers investment choices, school vouchers would give parents education choices, and Medicare privatization would give retirees health care choices. All of this is technically true: Social Security privatization, for example, really would present new opportunities for investing retirement savings.

Body Politics
August 08, 2005

A pizza delivery car cruises down a leafy suburban street as a man in a black overcoat and a red power tie scampers after it, waving a piece of paper. "Trial lawyers used to only chase ambulances," explains a voice-over. "Now they're chasing restaurant deliveries to cash in on obesity."Even if you haven't seen this advertisement, you may understand the message. Over the last few years, attorneys have been filing lawsuits on behalf of obese consumers, claiming that restaurants and the food industry should be held legally responsible for making people fat.

TRB From Ann Arbor: Body Politics
August 08, 2005

A pizza delivery car cruises down a leafy suburban street as a man in a black overcoat and a red power tie scampers after it, waving a piece of paper. "Trial lawyers used to only chase ambulances," explains a voice-over. "Now they're chasing restaurant deliveries to cash in on obesity."Even if you haven't seen this advertisement, you may understand the message. Over the last few years, attorneys have been filing lawsuits on behalf of obese consumers, claiming that restaurants and the food industry should be held legally responsible for making people fat.

Going to the Matt
July 25, 2005

So this is how serious the controversy over Karl Rove has gotten for the White House: On Monday, Press Secretary Scott McClellan actually had to dodge a question from Fox News. It came from correspondent Carl Cameron: “Does the president continue to have confidence in Mr. Rove?” Relatively speaking, it was one of the softer inquiries McClellan fielded in an ugly briefing that Washington Post columnist Dana Milbank described as “perhaps the worst” of McClellan’s two-year tenure.

Health Inspection
June 20, 2005

Poor Wal-Mart is feeling a little bit, well, picked upon. Sure, the company just generated $285 billion in sales and $10 billion in profits. And, yes, it is rapidly expanding into such far-flung places as China. But, here in the United States, Wal-Mart's growth plans have suddenly run into political opposition from labor unions and liberal politicians--who, according to the company, aren't being fair.While critics have long attacked Wal-Mart for everything from destroying mom- and-pop stores to exploiting cheap foreign labor, the focus of the present controversy is health insurance.

Losing Hope
May 23, 2005

Not so long ago in a political galaxy that only seems far away, George W.

Morning-After Sickness
May 02, 2005

It is no great secret that Democrats have been losing political fights over abortion for a while. And it's no great secret why. Although a majority of Americans agree with liberals that abortion should be legal, the right has succeeded in starting political debates that end up making liberals look like extremists. One method has been to focus on partial-birth abortion, a practice that most Americans oppose because it seems cruel.

Kill Phil
April 25, 2005

Things look relatively good for the Democrats right now. Social Security privatization is practically dead, Tom DeLay is actually on the defensive, and President Bush's approval rating is below 50 percent in many polls. But then there is Phil. Phil is the cartoon star of a new political advertising campaign to preserve the filibuster--the parliamentary maneuver that allows members of the U.S. Senate to delay votes indefinitely and that has, for the last few months, enabled Democrats to prevent the full Senate from voting on a handful of conservative Bush judicial nominees.

Tax Alternative
March 28, 2005

Alan Greenspan's appearance before Congress early this month provoked plenty of criticism. And rightly so. The longtime chairman of the Federal Reserve had been asked to comment on the government's failure to control budget deficits and the economic danger those deficits pose. But Greenspan was no innocent bystander to this act of gross fiscal negligence. In 2001, back when the budget was still in surplus, Greenspan urged Congress to enact President Bush's proposed tax cuts; two years later, even after those surpluses were gone, Greenspan endorsed yet another round of Bush tax reductions.

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