Michelle Goldberg

Quiet Desperation
March 28, 2011

No book is as closely associated with the rise of second-wave feminism as The Feminine Mystique, but many feminists regard it with deep ambivalence. I

The Enthusiast
January 31, 2011

In his new book, Leigh Eric Schmidt, a historian of religion, uses Ida Craddock’s life to illuminate this fascinating period in American religious his

Superwoman
November 16, 2010

Cleopatra was a brilliant politician and strategist who became an icon of sinuous feminine danger and manipulation. She has long been the archetypical

The Faith Continent
August 05, 2010

No single volume could do justice to India’s lush religious diversity, but I have never read one that encompasses more of it, or that penetrates deepe

The Horror, The Horror
June 17, 2010

Charles Bowden sees Juárez as a harbinger of planetary chaos, a vision of a world undone by inequality and ravenous appetites. “Juárez is not behind

Lost in Translation
March 25, 2010

The Forty Rules of Love is a terribly frustrating novel, because almost everything about it is wonderful except for the work itself.

Truther Consequences
October 07, 2009

Alex Jones is a husky man with short sandy hair, weary eyes, baby cheeks, and the kind of deep, gravelly voice made for horror-movie trailers. And it’s horror he has in mind. "Your New World Order will fall!" he screams through a megaphone at the shiny façade of a nondescript office building. "Humanity will defeat you!" A syndicated radio host, filmmaker, and all-around countercultural icon based in Austin, Texas, Jones has long been one of the country’s most significant purveyors of paranoia.

The End Of An Error
January 09, 2009

Ok, maybe this makes up for Rick Warren. A couple of months ago, Obama seemed to be walking back from his promise to undo the destructive “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy on gays in the military. But today, in a video posted on the change.gov website (a site, full disclosure, designed by my husband, who works for the Obama transition), Robert Gibbs sounded pretty unambiguous. The five-minute segment featured Gibbs answering questions that had been posted on the site and voted up by users.

Three a.m. for Feminism
June 25, 2008

Amy Siskind, a 42-year-old mother of two from Westchester, stood in a Washington, D.C., park on the last day in May, telling a few hundred cheering people that she would not, under any circumstances, vote for Barack Obama. She was a lifelong Democrat, she said, a donor and a volunteer for the party.

Three A.M. for Feminism
June 25, 2008

Amy Siskind, a 42-year-old mother of two from Westchester, stood in a Washington, D.C., park on the last day in May, telling a few hundred cheering people that she would not, under any circumstances, vote for Barack Obama. She was a lifelong Democrat, she said, a donor and a volunteer for the party. But, watching the race with a “mixture of shock, disgrace, and disgust,” she was appalled at the leadership’s failure to defend Hillary Clinton from the sexism that she believes bolstered Barack Obama’s campaign.

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