Michelle Goldberg

No book is as closely associated with the rise of second-wave feminism as The Feminine Mystique, but many feminists regard it with deep ambivalence. I

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The Enthusiast

In his new book, Leigh Eric Schmidt, a historian of religion, uses Ida Craddock’s life to illuminate this fascinating period in American religious his

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Superwoman

Cleopatra was a brilliant politician and strategist who became an icon of sinuous feminine danger and manipulation. She has long been the archetypical

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No single volume could do justice to India’s lush religious diversity, but I have never read one that encompasses more of it, or that penetrates deepe

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Charles Bowden sees Juárez as a harbinger of planetary chaos, a vision of a world undone by inequality and ravenous appetites. “Juárez is not behind

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The Forty Rules of Love is a terribly frustrating novel, because almost everything about it is wonderful except for the work itself.

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Alex Jones is a husky man with short sandy hair, weary eyes, baby cheeks, and the kind of deep, gravelly voice made for horror-movie trailers. And it’s horror he has in mind. "Your New World Order will fall!" he screams through a megaphone at the shiny façade of a nondescript office building. "Humanity will defeat you!" A syndicated radio host, filmmaker, and all-around countercultural icon based in Austin, Texas, Jones has long been one of the country’s most significant purveyors of paranoia.

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Ok, maybe this makes up for Rick Warren. A couple of months ago, Obama seemed to be walking back from his promise to undo the destructive “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy on gays in the military. But today, in a video posted on the change.gov website (a site, full disclosure, designed by my husband, who works for the Obama transition), Robert Gibbs sounded pretty unambiguous. The five-minute segment featured Gibbs answering questions that had been posted on the site and voted up by users.

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Amy Siskind, a 42-year-old mother of two from Westchester, stood in a Washington, D.C., park on the last day in May, telling a few hundred cheering people that she would not, under any circumstances, vote for Barack Obama. She was a lifelong Democrat, she said, a donor and a volunteer for the party.

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Amy Siskind, a 42-year-old mother of two from Westchester, stood in a Washington, D.C., park on the last day in May, telling a few hundred cheering people that she would not, under any circumstances, vote for Barack Obama. She was a lifelong Democrat, she said, a donor and a volunteer for the party. But, watching the race with a “mixture of shock, disgrace, and disgust,” she was appalled at the leadership’s failure to defend Hillary Clinton from the sexism that she believes bolstered Barack Obama’s campaign.

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