Our Whole Life

Our whole life a translation the permissible fibs and now a knot of lies eating at itself to get undone Words bitten thru words meanings burnt-off like paint under the blowtorch All those dead letters rendered into the oppressor's language Trying to tell the doctor where it hurts like the Algerian who has walked from his village, burning his whole body a cloud of pain and there are no words for this except himself Adrienne Rich is an American poet. This poem appeared in the May 2, 1970 issue of the magazine.

What should be the criteria for appointment to the Supreme Court? Judges of the United States Supreme Court are required—the word is dictated even mor

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The Founding Fathers, who met in the summer of 1787 to draw up a Constitution for the United States, gave relatively little attention to the judiciary. Clearly they had only a hazy notion of the vital role the judiciary was to play in umpiring the federal system or in limiting the powers of government. Article III of the Constitution says nothing whatever about the qualifications of judges, or about the mechanics of choice. Indeed it says practically nothing about the mechanics of the judicial system itself.

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This article was originally published on October 27, 1920. The chief distinguishing aspect of the Presidential campaign of 1920 is the eclipse of liberalism or progressivism as an effective force in American politics. In every previous election, at least since 1896, one candidate or one party advanced a valid claim for support of those voters who believed that the public welfare demanded more or less drastic changes in national organization and policy; and since 1904 the preponderant preference of this progressive vote has determined the result of the election.

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How the Blitz is changing our culture.

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Go Home, Buddy Glass

What made Salinger's Glass family so singular--and irritating.

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Assessing Salinger, eight years after his magnum opus.

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Why was J.D. Salinger so successful?

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Mad About Children

Enough of Holden Caulfield, already!

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This piece was originally published on August 24, 1968. William Faulkner located Mulberry Street so precisely and described its major industry so vividly in one of his early novels that lustful visitors from the rural mid-South memorized the passage and used it as their guide to the rows of dingy houses where three-dollar whores did business until the military authorities forced the city to clean up the neighborhood during World War II. Before virtue was imposed, white customers had access to white girls and black girls-in different houses, of course.

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