Impasse At Paris

After more than four months and 24 sessions, the Paris talks are still at an impasse; no progress has been made; there have been only "official conversations" and no negotiations. These meetings have provided both sides with full opportunity to expound official positions on the origins and development of the conflict and to castigate each other's very different interpretations. But all this has amounted to little more than repetition of statements made publicly elsewhere by spokesmen of both governments.

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Black Cooperatives

A major preoccupation of American social scientists is demonstrating that radicals have no following. According to samplings made for Xerox's "Black America" television specials, for instance, only six percent of black people "approve" of Stokely Carmichael. For all the agitation over community control of schools in New York, the Center for Urban Education reports that only one-third of Bedford-Stuyvesant residents favor community control. These results are hardly a revelation.

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Birmingham, Ala.—The test of the Democratic Party's willingness to cope effectively with racist politics in the Deep South in 1968 will center around the three-way fight shaping up for Alabama's one set of credentials at Chicago. There will be major credentials challenges from other states, notably Mississippi, but only in Alabama do the options cover the field—from the Wallace-infested "regular" delegates elected in the spring primary, through an old-style "loyalist" group going under the name of the Alabama Independent Democrats (AID), to the National Democratic Party of Alabama, a vigorous

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Jaw-jaw is better than war-war," remarked Winston Churchill. But the two are not mutually exclusive. The "jaw-jaw" of the Peace Talks has de-escalated to one low-key session a week, while the "war-war" has escalated to a new peak of intensity and human loss. Are the Paris talks a cruel mockery? Is anything happening here; can anything happen here? One is tempted to dismiss it all as unreal. Outside the halls and lobbies France has quivered in crisis.

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"I wonder if you could add one small item to your shopping list?" Kim Philby wrote from Moscow to his wife Eleanor who was visiting in California. "I was thinking of some song-restorer for the canary. There was one feeble effort to sing the other night, but since then silence again. On all other counts, he seems perfectly fit, good appetite, bright eyes, and he gives his usual warning cheeps .when I go near his cage. Perhaps he has just forgotten how. . . ."Or perhaps being in a cage does not fill one's heart with gladness.

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If anyone had asked me which contemporary American writer was best equipped to write a definitive description of love and sex, if he so desired, I wou

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This has been a “quiet” season; foreign visitors have expressed surprise mingled with a relief at how 1966 everything in New York looks. But unless we

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Criticism of our space program is overdue. In the last eight fiscal years the United States has spent more than $30 billion on it-not $20 billion in 10 years, as President Johnson maintains. We have made more than 500 space launches, our astronauts have completed more than 1,300 man-orbits around the earth, we can now realistically assess the worth of manned space flight. Finally, Project Apollo's termination in 1969-1970 makes mandatory a sharp drop in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration budget.

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Homage to France

Why does art seem to bloom at certain times in certain countries and then fade out abruptly? One might argue that the First World War and the Depressi

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Exit McNamara

The scariest explanation of why Robert McNamara is quitting was suggested--and promptly disavowed--by the Washington Star in an editorial the day after the story broke. The Star said that some persons feared that he was "getting out in advance of some major escalation of the war--an escalation which he cannot bring himself to support." Without much conviction, the Star said it could not believe any such thing. When the two surviving Generals ofthe Army, Dwight D. Eisenhower and Omar N.

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