Pnin By Vladimir Nabokov (Doubleday; $3.50) When some of these sketches appeared in The New Yorker, it was clear that an extraordinarily memorable figure had been created, an individual so appealing and telling and plausible that he would not easily be forgotten. And now that we have seen Pnin even more distinctly, his idiosyncracies and above all the charm and the melancholy of his life still more touchingly illuminated, we recognize in him, as in Oblmov or Gregor Samsa, the superb fictional embodiment of a particular yet universal human situation.

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Will we abandon our one secure bastion in the Middle East?

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The tragic epic of the people of Hungary has so enthralled the imagination of the world that we are in danger of being indifferent to another drama of

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The situation and circumstances for writers are incomparably better in America than in most countries. The writers of most other nations already burde

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For five years the West has been baffled by the strange flight to Russia of Donald Maclean and Guy Burgess, two officials in the British Foreign Office. Both were in disgrace. Burgess had just been sent back from America after the British Embassy in Washington had been driven nearly mad by his drunken behavior and incompetence. Maclean, son of a puritanical Scotsman who was at one time a Minisiter in a Liberal Government, was under far graver suspicion.

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A Soldier's Homer

Now, anyone who has a go at The Odyssey should first disabuse himself of the traditional view that it stands to The Iliad as, say Paradise Regained st

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The impression I get from the poems and fragments of poems of René Char is that they are parts of something larger, from the same block. There is alwa

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The Talmadge Story

Only an act of God can keep Herman Talmadge out of the United States Senate," is the way a Georgia politician sums up the situation in his state. No active opposition of consequence to Talmadge has shown up. It is safe to say that nobody of political consequence cares to dispute the right of way with "Hummon." This is startling, in view of Georgia's history of bitter factionalism—startling until one realizes that there is now but one faction, due to the domination sedulously built up by Talmadge in the decade since his father's death.

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A novel might be defined as a long but unified story, designed to be read at more than one sitting, that deals with a group of lifelike characters in

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No one is more pleased and encouraged than I am about the changes that have recently occurred in Russia. They have unquestionably helped to reduce wor

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