The first use of the atomic bomb against a hostile population has, in spite of its stunning success as a weapon of war, brought forth expressions of guilt and horror from many parts of the world. These emotions have been felt even in the victorious nations, and even by persons who are glad on the whole that it was employed to bring the war to a quick end. They are probably less strong in the United States than in England, which has suffered the actual experience of indiscriminate devastation from the air. It is indeed difficult to justify use of an extreme form of the kind of weapon which hit

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Time to reassess our twenty-eighth president.

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We've forgotten his role on the global stage.

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Bretton Woods

The United States government must soon pass judgment on the Bretton Woods Conference, in which the representatives of 44 nations proposed that there b

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A dispatch from 1945 describes the Catholic leadership's attempts to stymie the spread of birth control.

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The Home Stretch

As the political campaign goes into its final days, the best informed observers appear to believe that President Roosevelt will win by a substantial margin. Our readers will hardly need to be told that the editors of The New Republic will view such an outcome with satisfaction. There are faults to find with the Roosevelt administration, both in its foreign policy and on the domestic front; we have never hesitated to point out what seemed to us to be failings, and we expect to continue to do so in the future.

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Nikolai Gogol By Vladimir Nabokov Norfolk, Conn: New Directions. 172 pages. $1.50. One fairly accurate cardiogram of just how violently the Anglo-American heart palpitates over one of Russia's supreme geniuses is furnished by the Britannica (fourteenth edition), GOGOL, NIKOLAI VASSILIEVICH, rates one column and a grudging third, a bibliography of four lines listing as many items (only one in English), and not even a cut of the man. GOLF, however, earns 18 columns (glossary, 3 columns; bibliography, one-third column; 10 line cuts and one plate of 9 halftones).

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The remarkable complacency of the Washington expert in the face of impending serious unemployment was discussed in the previous article. Before enlarg

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If you are white and are reading this vignette, don’t take it for granted that all Harlem is a slum. It isn’t.

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The United States is a nation of magazine readers. The British, French, Russians, and Germs read, in normal times, far more books than we do, but fewe

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