Pessimism, that variety which is collectively contagious, is a disease which affects primarily the highly developed parts of a society—the sensitive and the educated—and there are today certain groups of Americans who seem to be most susceptible.

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Crystal and Ruby

The Knight in the Tiger's Skin By Shot'ha Rust'hveli New York: International Publishers. 347 pages. $4.50. Tariel, the sunlike, the cypress-formed, may be inferior, spiritually and intellectually, to his Western brethren, King Arthur's knights, but, otherwise, he puts them rather into the shade. Matched with this mournful, moaning, "mad-minded" rover, great Lancelot of the Lake would seem almost perky, and romantic Sir Tristram a very lukewarm lover.

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Serge Diaghilev: An Intimate Biography By Serge Lifar New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons. 413 pages, $5 The Russian Renaissance is a curiously lovely thing to look back at over one's shoulder, blending as it does priceless artistic magic with a touch of eerie futility and the pathos of its impending doom.

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Rilke in Wartime

For Rilke those four years were a negative and numbing horror that froze his poetic impulse, a suspension of the intelligible. For a week or two at it

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When an art dies, there is no announcement in the newspapers, as in the case of the demise of an eminent citizen. So no one knows that it is dead. It

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“Native Son” is the most impressive American novel I have read since “The Grapes of Wrath.” In some ways the two books resemble each other: both deal

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The Two Scrooges

Dualism runs all through Dickens. There always has to be a good and a bad of everything: each of the books has its counterbalancing values, and pairs

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Tradition and Value

Mr. Daiches has not only read Conrad, Joyce, Huxley and Woolf with the greatest care, but really likes their work and is not ashamed to say so.

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Jazzmen

The trouble with most writing about jazz is that it reads one or more of several ways: as though it had been written with the attitude of a class secr

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Jacob and the Angel

In that curious but not ill paid class of those who compile anthologies, Mr. de la Mare occupies a lonely eminence. Out of a job that is more often he

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