Lease-Lend Revisions

The Lease-Lend Bill will pass; the important question is how soon and with what modifications. Passage without change of a word or a comma three months or even six weeks from now might be worth less than passage in a few days with alterations. The President has therefore been wise to consult with congressional leaders and consent to changes that do not alter the essence of the measure. Other amendments will be offered in both House and Senate.

READ MORE >>

The Spirits: 100 Proof

It started out as many such things start: kids helling around making music, and trying to make it pay off in pennies and nickels. That was many years

READ MORE >>

Slava Bohu, The Story of the DukhoborsBy J. F. C. Wright. New York: Farrar and Rinehart. 438 pages. $3.50. Nu (as the author would say), this is a highly entertaining account of what the Dukhobors did, or declined to do, in Caucasia and Canada. Although the first chapters dealing with the history of the movement are anything but dull, the real fun starts when the bearded babes have been shipped to the remote wood selected for them by hopeful humanitarians.

READ MORE >>

Pessimism, that variety which is collectively contagious, is a disease which affects primarily the highly developed parts of a society—the sensitive and the educated—and there are today certain groups of Americans who seem to be most susceptible.

READ MORE >>

Crystal and Ruby

The Knight in the Tiger's Skin By Shot'ha Rust'hveli New York: International Publishers. 347 pages. $4.50. Tariel, the sunlike, the cypress-formed, may be inferior, spiritually and intellectually, to his Western brethren, King Arthur's knights, but, otherwise, he puts them rather into the shade. Matched with this mournful, moaning, "mad-minded" rover, great Lancelot of the Lake would seem almost perky, and romantic Sir Tristram a very lukewarm lover.

READ MORE >>

Serge Diaghilev: An Intimate Biography By Serge Lifar New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons. 413 pages, $5 The Russian Renaissance is a curiously lovely thing to look back at over one's shoulder, blending as it does priceless artistic magic with a touch of eerie futility and the pathos of its impending doom.

READ MORE >>

Rilke in Wartime

For Rilke those four years were a negative and numbing horror that froze his poetic impulse, a suspension of the intelligible. For a week or two at it

READ MORE >>

When an art dies, there is no announcement in the newspapers, as in the case of the demise of an eminent citizen. So no one knows that it is dead. It

READ MORE >>

“Native Son” is the most impressive American novel I have read since “The Grapes of Wrath.” In some ways the two books resemble each other: both deal

READ MORE >>

The Two Scrooges

Dualism runs all through Dickens. There always has to be a good and a bad of everything: each of the books has its counterbalancing values, and pairs

READ MORE >>

Pages