Lincoln as War Leader

With these four volumes Carl Sandburg completes the life of Lincoln begun in "The Prairie Years." Taking the total achievement, there is nothing in historical literature that I know quite comparable with it. I generally distrust the meeting of perfect writer and perfect theme. There is a blueprint seemliness about such conjunctions that rarely issues in a creative product.

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Lincoln as War Leader

With these four volumes Carl Sandburg completes the life of Lincoln begun in “The Prairie Years.” Taking the total achievement, there is nothing in hi

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As a film that neither attempts more than it can do nor is satisfied with the trivial, Port of Shadows is a pleasure. It was made in France by Marcel Carné; and apart from the thrills and satisfactions of its story, it is one of those things an occasional French film-maker does so perfectly: an atmosphere created, a mood unbroken.

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Rilke in English

Not the least interesting phenomenon of the last four years has been the growing influence of Rilke upon English poetry: indeed, Rilke is probably more read and more highly esteemed by English and Americans than by Germans, just as Byron and Poe had

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A man does not have to agree with Pound to acknowledge the excellence of what he has written. For myself I disagree with him fundamentally and finally

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Uncle Matthew

Let us hasten to say that Mr. Trilling’s study of Arnold is a valuable and most interesting book. Matthew Arnold has stood up remarkably well; he has

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Rilke Literally

The first comprehensive translation of Rilke’s poetry appears in America after interest in Rilke’s work, on the Continent and in England, has reached

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Italian Anti-Semitism

Those who will now try to prove the incompatibility of this Italian neo-racism and Mussolinian fascist ideology, or Italian tradition, are forgetting

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This is an eight-by-nine book of eighty-seven photographs on glazed paper. The pictures were taken in the Eastern part of the United States during the

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The Framers of the United States Constitution sought to limit the tendency of chief executives to enhance their power and lead their peoples into war, by providing that Congress alone should have the right to declare war and that the President's treaty-making power should be shared with the Senate. James Madison remarked in a letter to William Cabell Rives: In no part of the Constitution is more wisdom to be found than in the clause which confides the question of war or peace to the legislature, and not to the executive department.

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