Rilke Literally

The first comprehensive translation of Rilke’s poetry appears in America after interest in Rilke’s work, on the Continent and in England, has reached

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Italian Anti-Semitism

Those who will now try to prove the incompatibility of this Italian neo-racism and Mussolinian fascist ideology, or Italian tradition, are forgetting

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This is an eight-by-nine book of eighty-seven photographs on glazed paper. The pictures were taken in the Eastern part of the United States during the

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Limit the War Power

The Framers of the United States Constitution sought to limit the tendency of chief executives to enhance their power and lead their peoples into war, by providing that Congress alone should have the right to declare war and that the President's treaty-making power should be shared with the Senate. James Madison remarked in a letter to William Cabell Rives: In no part of the Constitution is more wisdom to be found than in the clause which confides the question of war or peace to the legislature, and not to the executive department.

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This is an enjoyable and illuminating book—if the luck of poetry in a dull world and a devoted woman’s battle to establish it here are of any concern

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Barcelona—It was a lovely false spring day when we started for the front this morning.

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Margaret Sanger’s state-by-state overview of birth control’s use and legality in 1938.

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In the mass of replies and counter-attacks written to answer Benjamin Stolberg’s “Inside the CIO” there has been one significant omission. The pamphlet, as everyone knows, was serialized in the Scripps-Howard papers in January, in twelve installments. As its main point was that Communists were in control of many CIO unions and were disrupting others, and as it appeared while the CIO was being attacked as Communist in New Jersey and elsewhere, it has provoked answers out of proportion to its importance as a piece of labor journalism.

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The speeches of Robert H. Jackson and Secretary Ickes, as well as the President's message to Congress and his Jackson Day address, have again brought to the foreground the problem of monopoly. It is now generally recognized that these utterances constitute an effective political counter-attack against those who have been blaming the administration for the depression. But what is the program of the President? Is he going to do anything about the situation except to make political capital out of it? The retort frequently made to Mr.

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On the front in the Spanish Civil War.

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