This Week

HERBERT HOOVER has been elected President by an overwhelming popular majority and the greatest electoral college vote in history. He will be supported by a clear majority, not only of titular Republicans but of those representing his wing of the party, in the House and probably in the Senate as well. The future therefore lies in his own hands. Few men in the history of the nation have ever faced greater opportunities or accepted a greater responsibility. The New Republic differs with Mr.

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How is Hoover?

The nomination by the Republican party of Herbert Hoover for President, like the nomination of Theodore Roosevelt in 1904, is a signal of the influence of novel factors in American politics. Mr. Hoover is an engineer who is also a business man. The methods which he represents as a business man are determined by training and experience as an engineer; and the purposes which inform his activities as an engineer are determined by his outlook as a business man. As a combination of engineer and business man he is a startling apparition in American politics.

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Lincoln? Lee?

This small, provocative book is less a parallel study of Lincoln and Lee than a closely packed, dramatic narrative of the trials of spirit that beset

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Washington Notes

Herbert Hoover and the 1928 Indiana Primary.

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Is there some fundamental canon of judgment which will give modernism in design a firm base to stand on? If such a base is lacking, we will only subst

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Not much less than a hundred years ago a certain baseball game played somewhere in these United States resulted in a score of 211 to 189. A great deal has happened to the great national pastime since then. It has, of course, become a highly efficient business, paying huge salaries, and earning enormous profits. It still lives--dollar for dollar, it is stronger than ever, in spite of several scandals, in spite of the commercialism that saddens local patriotism by swapping the players around as if they were second-hand automobiles. But it is no longer the big American sport.

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Ibsen the Romantic

With Ibsen as with Beethoven the beauty comes not from the tunes, but from the way they are used and are worked into the joints of the action.

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The exhibition of modern French decorative art at Lord and Taylor’s has breadth, sweep, élan. The space has been generously disposed: the furniture an

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The first two volumes of the official biography of Woodrow Wilson are now before the public: the first deals with Wilson's early life up to the time of his going to Princeton as a professor, and the second takes him up to his resignation as president of Princeton. Mr.

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Children should not at any age be taught that certain parts of the body are peculiar. Questions about sexual matters must be answered in the same tone

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