The Muffled Ship

It was cold and gray, but the band on shore was playing, and the flags on shore fluttering, and the long double-tiered wharf crowded with welcomers in

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HAVING discharged the President of the National Association of Letter Carriers and the President of the National Rural Letter Carriers’ Association and the President of the Railway Mail Association and the Secretary-Treasurer of the National Federation of Postal Employees, Mr.

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WHILE the world is being made safe for democracy and the law-abiding, democracy itself is being made safe for the lawbreaker. One after another, our penal and correctional institutions are experimenting with inmate self-government; the criminal is being painlessly inoculated with group consciousness.

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Had I been an Israelite I would never have denied being a member of a race occupying such a unique place in the religious history of mankind. I send y

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“The only women that the authorities over here really want are the trained nurses. Where do college women come in? Yet college men started the American Ambulance.” This remark was made the second year of the war by a distinguished college woman who had just come up to Rome from Corfu where she had been aiding in the resuscitation of the Serbians after their magnificent retreat. Having already served in two wars, speaking modern Greek, and being an English citizen by marriage, she had rare things to offer and was given the rare chance that comes only to those who are ready.

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MARCH 9th: Last night we had our second big air raid. As soon as the sharp sound of the explosions had died away—before the French cannonading had stopped and well before the berloque announced the end—I stuck my head out of my window. Utter blackness, blackness impenetrable, blackness that denied the very possibility of light, yet through it, on the street below, was already traveling something warm and vibrant and human: the Paris crowd. It was as if a river, obstructed for a moment, had found its normal course again.

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War, as a social function, differs in kind, not merely in degree, from a croquet party or an afternoon tea. This important truth, apparently self-evident, is realized only with much travail by a peace-loving and peace-wonted people. For the present generation of Americans three years of fighting in Europe have done much to prepare our minds for the whole truth.

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H.G. Wells says "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, by James Joyce is a book to buy and read and lock up..."

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Lincoln in 1917

Early in November, 1864, immediately after his reelection, President Lincoln made a brief speech upon the results of the election which compares in substance, if not in form, with the Gettysburg address and the Second Inaugural. In a few pregnant phrases he sketched what the peculiar dangers were which are bound to beset a democracy when engaged in a serious war.

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Abraham Lincoln by Lord Charnwood. Makers of the Nineteenth Century Series. New York: Henry Holt & Co. $2.00. The frankness and commonsense of Lord Charnwood's treatment of much debated matters in our political history may be illustrated by a passage relating to Jefferson and the Declaration of Independence. That was not a very candid state paper, he says, and the sentiments aroused for it afterwards by the popularity of Jefferson not wholly free from humbug. But the critics of the equality clause misconceive it.

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