Alcoa

What would Ron Bloom Say?
December 07, 2009

My eye was drawn to the provocative headline, “Alcoa head says weak dollar is bad for US industry.” How could that be? Aren’t American manufacturing firms being hurt by an overvalued dollar that increases the price of their goods made here relative, say, to imports from China? That may be true, I learned, but that is not what bothers Klaus Kleinfeld, the CEO of Alcoa. He is worried because a weaker dollar makes the products that Alcoa manufactures outside the United States more expensive inside the United States. “It is actually hurting us substantially,” Kleinfeld told the Financial Times.

Why Big Alumnium's Backing A Carbon Cap
May 18, 2009

Jim Tankersley of the Los Angeles Times has an useful piece today asking why companies like Alcoa are rallying behind a cap-and-trade system for greenhouse gases. After all, Alcoa is one of the world's largest alumnium manufacturers, and it relies heavily on fossil fuels: Its 9,000-acre smelter in southwestern Indiana uses as much coal power each year as a city of 200,000. A carbon cap would likely raise energy prices for the company in the immediate term and put it at a disadvantage against competitors in China and elsewhere. Why would its executives support this?

Sounds of Silence
January 15, 2001

Like a Giant Valium descending on Dulles International Airport, the Bush transition has come to Washington. Despite a good-faith effort to get exercised over John "Bob Jones Loves Me" Ashcroft, most of us seem already sedated by the sheer grown-upness of it all. Compared with the Clintonistas, yapping into cell phones at the Dupont Circle Starbucks at all hours of the day and night, the Bushies seem preternaturally calm. Where we once had a permanent campaign, we now have intermittent naps.

Romney and the Republicans
March 05, 1962

Selig S. Harrison's 1962 profile of Republican candidate George Romney's plans for the Republican party.

Standard Oil: Axis Ally
April 06, 1942

IN THE MIDST of the storm and the thunder, the lightning strikes. American industry and the press have demanded of labor whether, after opposing a cut in wages, it dares to look General MacArthur in the face.

Lease-Lend Revisions
February 10, 1941

The Lease-Lend Bill will pass; the important question is how soon and with what modifications. Passage without change of a word or a comma three months or even six weeks from now might be worth less than passage in a few days with alterations. The President has therefore been wise to consult with congressional leaders and consent to changes that do not alter the essence of the measure. Other amendments will be offered in both House and Senate.