Alec MacGillis

From an ex-Mormon missive to a Tagg tale, here are the stories that helped shape the conversation in ’12.

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The two ways Hurricane Sandy might help Obama seal his victory—and the one way it could put Romney ahead.

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Romney's snipe at Obama last night was meant to assure conservatives that only losers care about global warming.

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1988 all over again? Romney accuses Obama of cultivating a welfare "base."

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Romney delivers a message capitalizing on the resentments of white working class voters—the exact voters he needs to win the election.

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Voter suppression isn't just for the South anymore

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After a supposedly disastrous month of anemic jobs growth and unforced errors, Obama appears to maintain his slight advantage over Romney in national polls. The stability of the race has surprised many, particularly those invested in the daily beat of the news cycle.

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Many commentators have correctly observed that the reelection of Governor Scott Walker is a grave blow to unions, especially public sector unions. They went all in to defeat Walker and, despite the great outpouring of protest last year against his collective bargaining bill, he won by a greater margin this time than he did in 2010. But something else was exemplified by the Wisconsin results. It’s not that unions can’t win a defensive fight.

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Welcome to The Plank. The original TNR group blog has been on hiatus since 2009—during which time, from what we can tell, the internet decided that the term “plank” is best used in reference to lying prostrate in public. That won’t do. We’re back to reclaim planking in the name of informed and lively conversation about the world of politics.  This blog will feature all of the voices our readers are already familiar with—though now you’ll be able to read Timothy Noah, Noam Scheiber, Alec MacGillis, and Jonathan Cohn in the same place.

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The Affordable Care Act is full of compromises—the subsidies aren’t as generous as they could be, for example, and there’s no public plan. But, for those of us who believe in the law, no compromise may be more threatening to the law’s success than its timing. In 2014, everybody making less than 133 percent of poverty becomes eligible for Medicaid, while people at higher incomes get the chance to buy comprehensive, subsidized insurance regardless of pre-existing medical conditions.

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