Alfred Hitchcock

The other day, two esteemed literary figures sent me a short questionnaire on Alfred Hitchcock. They wondered, do I think about him? I do.

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When Alfred Hitchcock died, Mark Crispin Miller wrote this impassioned defense of Hitchcock's legacy against the onslaught of his critics, citing him as "among the greatest artists of this century."

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The acclaimed director of "Oldboy" stumbles in his American debut.

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"The Girl" is like a real-life version of "Vertigo": it's about a man who falls in love with an actress and tries to remake her.

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Do American movies still aspire to greatness?

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Cary Fukunaga’s Jane Eyre opened over a month ago, but it’s staying in theaters and word-of-mouth is building. As well it might. There have been too many film adaptations of the Charlotte Bronte novel (published in 1847), and some of us have wearied of keeping up with them all. So I neglected the picture when it opened, but was stirred into action by my wife, Lucy Gray, who told me it was wonderful. She was right—she usually is.

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As a person, he was the most deferential of the New Wave directors, yet the most persistent. Eric Rohmer. He died yesterday, aged eighty-nine, and he had made 50 films in that time--as regular, as festive, but as resigned as birthdays--and they were all the same film, about men and women looking at each other. It sounds commonplace as a subject, perhaps, calm and contemplative. But consider for a moment. Are you more or less a man or a woman? Are you more or less tied up with someone?

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