Arab Spring

Why unrest persists in Suez but not in other parts of Egypt.

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Egypt Has Replaced a Single Dictator With a Slew of Dictatorial Institutions

The sad story of Amr Hamzawy and Emad Shahin

On June 5, 2013, Amr Hamzawy, an academic and former liberal parliamentarian, tweeted a quick criticism of the verdict of an Egyptian court. Earlier this month, he discovered that he was being investigated for a criminal offense and was barred from leaving the country. The grave crime in question? Insulting the judiciary.

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The uprisings now sometimes collectively called “The Arab Spring” seemed at first like stories about the political and economic empowerment of young people. But in Egypt, after the military removed President Mohamed Morsi from power in July, some youth have begun to look at the events of the last two years in a different light: In February of 2011, President Hosni Mubarak stepped down with millions of Egyptians in the streets.

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Egyptians marked the fortieth anniversary of their army's putative triumph over Israel by bloodying one another in Tahrir Square. Syrians, too, commemorated the date with internecine violence. Only in Israel were chests, rather than heads, beaten in collective remembrance. The contrast illustrated the curious ways history can be marshaled, forgotten, and mourned. Memory indeed serves, but ever-changing masters. 

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The Unluckiest People on Earth

Syrians refugees thought Egypt would be safe. They were wrong.

Long before the start of the Arab Spring, Syrians in the southern town of Saqba had close ties with Egyptians in Damietta. For generations, the two towns were their countries’ capitals of furniture making, and businessmen and artisans moved back and forth between them. When Syrian President Bashar al Assad’s regime began driving citizens from their homes, many residents of Saqba found Damietta a logical destination. Some had existing relationships with Egyptians there, and Egypt overall was welcoming toward Syrian refugees.

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'Its Name Is Fascism'

The supporters of Egypt's military aren't liberals

Cairo is no longer the capital of Arab hope. It is now the capital of Arab despair. Or so it deserves to be, except that despair does not appear to be the dominant Arab response, and more importantly, the dominant Egyptian response, to the violent destruction of the Egyptian revolution by the Egyptian army. This is the Eighteenth Brumaire of Abdel Fattah el-Sisi. The army has now committed three massacres. Emergency rule has been declared.

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Civil State or Civil War?

Egypt could become the next Turkey. It could also become the next Algeria.

Behind the debate about whether the July 3 ouster of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi should be considered a popular impeachment or a military coup, there is a basic question: Are things in Egypt going to get better or worse?

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Welcome to Phase Three of the Arab Spring

Islamists are waning in the Arab world. But will Obama notice?

Islamists are waning in the Arab world. But will Obama notice?

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Future Perfect author Steven Johnson takes Evgeny Morozov to task for his critical book review.

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Groups like Occupy Wall Street embraced the open-source logic of the Internet as an organizing principle. It explains a lot about why movements fail. 

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