army

Out of the Fight for Warsaw
September 17, 1953

How can an intellectual preserve his humanity amid totalitarianism?

Military Civil Rights: A Report
October 19, 1952

Four years ago, on July 26, 1948, President Truman issued his Executive Order 9981, directing "as rapidly as possible" a policy establishing "equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion or national origin." This year, in the heat of another election, an accounting to the American people on the effectiveness, sincerity and execution of this directive seems in order since civil rights is a major issue in the campaign.   An Executive Order to wipe out, in our armed service what has been accepted as standard within military un

A Military Bill of Rights
August 08, 1949

The Truman Administration is now endeavoring to prove its liberalism through the armed services. The Congressional civil war on civil rights has made it impossible for the Administration to show its sincerity on this vital part of the Fair Deal program with legislation this year. Enforcement of fair racial policies in the Army, Navy and Air Force, however, is well within the Administration's power.

Inside Occupied Russia
February 22, 1943

With the victorious Russian armies continuing their advance, and reclaiming territories that have been occupied by the Germans for more than a year, there is special interest in the character of life inside occupied Russia. We present herewith what is, we believe, the first account to reach America of conditions in these territories. —THE EDITORS   THE GERMAN ARMIES have swept over vast areas of Soviet Russia.

The Shipping Bottleneck
May 25, 1942

THE GREAT DAY arrives. “I christen thee Western Light!” the woman cries.

The Crisis of the United Nations
March 16, 1942

THIS IS A TIME of storm and smoke; of darkness, as Carl Sandberg found the time of Lincoln to be. Death is in the air. So is birth. Within the body of our wartime world we can feel the life of the future stirring. Beneath the sound of the guns, we can hear its first, protesting cries. In fury, all the forces of the past are raining their blows upon it. We bear it fearfully, seeking to shield and cherish it. Yet we forget the astonishing strength of the will to live with which all forms of life come into being. We stand in shyness before the future that we carry within us.

TNR Film Classics: ‘The Maltese Falcon’ (October 20, 1941)
October 20, 1941

The Maltese Falcon is the first crime melodrama with finish, speed and bang to come along in what seems ages, and since its pattern is one of the best things Hollywood does, we have been missing it. It is the old Dashiell Hammett book, written back in the days when you could turn out a story and leave it at that, without any characters joining the army, fleeing as refugees or reforming bad boys, men or women.

Lease-Lend Revisions
February 10, 1941

The Lease-Lend Bill will pass; the important question is how soon and with what modifications. Passage without change of a word or a comma three months or even six weeks from now might be worth less than passage in a few days with alterations. The President has therefore been wise to consult with congressional leaders and consent to changes that do not alter the essence of the measure. Other amendments will be offered in both House and Senate.

Limit the War Power
and
July 27, 1938

The Framers of the United States Constitution sought to limit the tendency of chief executives to enhance their power and lead their peoples into war, by providing that Congress alone should have the right to declare war and that the President's treaty-making power should be shared with the Senate. James Madison remarked in a letter to William Cabell Rives: In no part of the Constitution is more wisdom to be found than in the clause which confides the question of war or peace to the legislature, and not to the executive department.

Hemingway Reports Spain
January 12, 1938

On the front in the Spanish Civil War.

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