banking

A New Direction For The Fed?
July 07, 2009

Policymakers like to make particular kinds of statements at a "low attention" moment, e.g., right before a holiday weekend. This gets items onto the public record but ensures they do not get too much attention. And if you are asked about these substantive issues down the road, you can always say, "we told you this already, so it's not now news"--usually this keeps things off the front page. Released on July 3rd (a federal holiday), and buried inside the Washington Post on Saturday (p.A12): An important speech (from June 26th) by the New York Fed's controversial President, William C.

Test Anxiety
June 03, 2009

What the banks still won't tell us.

Dodd Complex
June 03, 2009

The father, the son, and a Connecticut dynasty in peril.

What Treasury Needs Is A Distraction
May 05, 2009

The bank stress tests are beginning to create a perception problem, but not--as you might think--for banks. Rather the issue is top level Administration officials' own optics (spin jargon for how we think about our rulers). At one level, the government's approach to banks--delay doing anything until the economy stabilizes--is working out nicely. This is the counterpart of the macroeconomic Summers Strategy and in principle it is brilliant.

Treasury: Regrets, I've Had A Few
April 22, 2009

If you haven't picked up on one of the dozens of recommendations from other blogs, I recommend reading Phillip Swagel's long and detailed account of the view of the financial crisis from his seat as assistant secretary for economic policy at the Treasury Department. It's particularly useful for people like me who make a habit of criticizing government officials. The writing is dry, but much of the subject matter is fascinating. It often explains or defends Treasury's actions during the crisis, but Swagel certainly owns up to plenty of mistakes or shortcomings.

Bring In The Antitrust Division (on Banking)
April 16, 2009

In early February I suggested there was a showdown underway between the US Treasury and the country's largest banks.  Treasury (with the Fed and other regulators) is responsible for the safety and soundness of the financial system, the banks are mostly looking out for their own executives, and the tension between these goals is - by now - quite evident. As we've been arguing since the beginning of the year, saving the banking system - at reasonable cost to the taxpayer - implies standing up to the bankers.  You can do this in various ways, through recapitalization if you are willing to commit 

The Oracle Is Upbeat
March 11, 2009

Warren Buffett, always the contrarian, takes a rather sanguine view of the banking sector. From his recent three-hour interview with CNBC: BUFFETT: Yeah, the interesting thing is that the toxic assets, if they're priced at market, are probably the best assets the banks has, because those toxic assets presently are being priced based on unleveraged buyers buying a fairly speculative asset.

The Scoop Factory
March 04, 2009

On the evening of January 22, a few hours after his administration's debut news conference, Barack Obama made a surprise visit to the cramped quarters of the White House press corps. It was meant to be a friendly event, and Obama glad-handed his way through reporters and cameramen, exchanging light banter as he went. But Politico reporter Jonathan Martin wasn't there to chat. Martin pressed Obama about the president's decision to nominate William J. Lynn III, a former defense lobbyist, to deputy defense secretary and about Obama's pledge to curtail the influence of lobbyists.

Medvedev Goes Shopping
October 08, 2008

As the United States falters, its competitors are scheming. On Monday, Dmitri Medvedev met with the leader of one of Russia's largest conglomerates, Mikhail Fridman of the Alfa Group, and gave his strong blessing for an acquisition of foreign banking holdings (preferably American.) He interjected at one point: “Maybe we should also buy something while it’s not too late?” and later insisted quite strongly that "despite the crisis ... there are nonetheless some good opportunities for concluding investment deals," to which Mr.

Was The Economic Portion Tonight Even Close?
September 27, 2008

David Kusnet was chief speechwriter for former President Bill Clinton from 1992 through 1994. He is the author of Love the Work, Hate the Job: Why America's Best Workers Are Unhappier than Ever (Wiley, 2008).   "I'm afraid Senator Obama doesn't understand the difference between a tactic and a strategy," John McCain said tonight in one of many attacks on his rival's maturity, judgment, and experience on national security issues.

Pages