Benghazi

Al Qaeda’s Not as Battered as Obama Thinks
November 29, 2012

Is the terror group dead or alive? It's complicated.

Has Benghazi Opportunism Run Its Course?
October 21, 2012

Will Romney keep trying to score points off of the Benghazi attack at the final debate, or has the Libya card played itself out?

Ben Affleck’s “Argo” Is Brilliant
October 16, 2012

The hostage crisis wasn't the disaster you've been led to believe -- and Ben Affleck's new film gets that

What Qaddafi’s Fall Means for His Evil Minions in South America, Asia, and Africa
August 26, 2011

Judging from the fervor of their celebrations, the Libyan people are acutely aware that they will benefit from the fall of Muammar Qaddafi. But Libya is hardly the only country that has reason to rejoice. As committed as the dictator was to destroying his own country, he posed an equal—perhaps even greater—danger to developing countries in other parts of the world. From the time he assumed power, Qaddafi leveraged Libya’s oil money, and his own willingness to have his country become a pariah state, to support insurgencies from East Asia, to South America, to southern Africa.

Libya: A Slideshow
June 20, 2011

In the most recent issue of The New Republic, Tom Malinowski, the Washington director for Human Rights Watch, writes about his recent trip to Libya and the state of the revolution. “For 40 years, under Muammar Qaddafi’s dictatorship, it was dangerous for Libyans even to have a conversation about what kind of country they wanted to live in,” he observed. “Now, in the eastern cities that have freed themselves from Qaddafi’s grip, something important is happening. An entire society is trying to define its political identity. This process could still end tragically.

Who Are the Libyan Rebels?
April 30, 2011

Benghazi, Libya—After the February 17 start of the revolution against longtime Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi, rebels moved swiftly to capitalize on their success by establishing interim governing and administrative bodies: the National Transitional Council (NTC), Crisis Team (CT), and Military Council. But who, exactly, is in these groups?

The Timeliness Paradox
March 27, 2011

Here is one lesson we can draw from the mostly negative media commentary about the Obama administration’s actions in Libya: Presidents get more credit for stopping atrocities after they begin than for preventing them before they get out of hand. The U.S.-led NATO intervention that stopped mass killing in Bosnia in 1995, for example, came only after 200,000 people had already been killed.

Obama’s Moment of Truth
March 15, 2011

Each president of the United States enters office thinking he will be able to define the agenda and set the course of America’s relations with the rest of the world. And, almost invariably, each confronts crises that are thrust upon him—wars, revolutions, genocides, and deadly confrontations. Neither Woodrow Wilson nor FDR imagined having to plunge America into world war. Truman had to act quickly, and with little preparation, to confront the menace of Soviet expansion at war’s end.

Obama, Libya, And Status Quo Bias
March 14, 2011

Sudarsan Raghavan of the Washington Post reports on the sickening unearthing of a secret prison in Libya: IN BENGHAZI, LIBYA Peering into a subterranean jail, Adil Gnaybor shuddered with fear. Rusted prison bars once covered with earth were now exposed, dug up by rebels who had discovered the secret labyrinth of cells.

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