Bob Bradley

Best of the Web, AM Edition
and
July 07, 2010

Paul the prognosticating octopus picks Spain Tom Williams: don't neglect the holding midfielder Zonal Marking's Germany-Spain preview The jingoistic simplification of the USA's run Fernando Duarte: Brazil's next coach Is Spain the most one-club-dependent team in Cup history? Jonathan Wilson: Netherlands vs. Uruguay analysis Steve Davis: raised expectations likely means Bob Bradley's out

Best of the Web, PM Edition
and
July 01, 2010

Nike's cursed "Write the Future" advert, re-edited Jonathan Wilson: Brazil vs. the Netherlands a potential classic A new book on the darker parts of World Cup history Zonal Marking: a preview of Argentina-Germany Richard Williams: Kaka "could ignite the tournament" Dunga vs. Johann Cruyff Brian Glanville: "England's pitiful debacle" Jon Stewart interviews Bob Bradley and Landon Donovan

Best of the Web, PM Edition
and
June 30, 2010

Jonathan Wilson: the glorious past of Ghanaian football Steve Davis: final USA player ratings Sean Ingle: "South America boosted by travel, hard work…and luck" Wilson (again!): England's obsolete 4-4-2 What's next for Bob Bradley? Blatter's strange technology flip-flop Is fear undermining England's best youth?

First They Ignore You
June 27, 2010

I was en route home from South Africa yesterday—and still haven’t made it to D.C.; I’m sipping a Jamba Juice and typing in the lovely JetBlue terminal at JFK—so I still haven’t seen all 120 minutes of USA-Ghana. The last 30, however, I did catch during a short layover in Dubai. I was drained, the U.S. seemed drained. Maybe it was sitting in a quiet airport lounge, listening to play by play in Arabic, with just a couple of American fans in a small group around a flat screen.

Could We Be Any More Likeable?
June 23, 2010

Every couple of months, Bob Bradley produces a crisis of faith. His team slips and the mind wonders, what if Jurgen Klinsmann were the man in charge? Would we look so shaky in the back? Would our attack have a bit more flair? And then his team turns around and pulls out an incredible result—a smashing victory of Mexico in the Gold Cup, a stolen win from Spain, a fantastic half against Brazil. In this tournament, he has outcoached Fabio Capello; his tactics have been, to my eyes, largely sound. He never lets his own ego or rigidity interfere with the pragmatism that the moment demands.

The Sixties Strike Back
June 19, 2010

Of all the advantages that England seemed to enjoy at the outset of their lifeless 0-0 draw with Algeria, perhaps none looked so dramatic on television as their vast handsomeness advantage. On the sideline there was David Beckham, of course, the only man alive who can make a mohawk look upstanding, and the coach Fabio Capello, who looked terrific and commanding--gorgeous light grey suit, charcoal shirt, black tie, and spectacles so impeccably designed they seem likely to inspire a line of kitchenware.

Sunil Gulati: U.S. Are Creative, Gosh Darnit
June 12, 2010

JOHANNESBURG -- The U.S., of course, gets set to kick off its World Cup campaign tonight against England in Rustenburg. But Sunil Gulati, the president of the U.S. Soccer Federation, which runs American soccer, was already in town last week, promoting the U.S. bid to host the tournament in either 2018 or 2022. My friend Jonty Mark, a soccer reporter for The Star, a Johannesburg daily, interviewed Gulati, a Columbia University economics professor, in his well-appointed hotel suite, and let me tag along. We asked him about the bid, but also about how far he thinks U.S.