Books

Separate But Equal
July 01, 1985

In the Company of Educated Women: A History of Women and Higher Education in America by Barbara Miller Solomon (Yale University Press, 298 pp., $25)  Women in College: Shaping New Feminine Identities by Mirra Komarovsky (Basic Books, 355 pp., $19.95) Alma Mater: Design and Experience in Women's Colleges from Their Nineteenth-Century Beginnings to the I930s by Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz (Knopf, 420 pp., $25)  “The absurdity of sending ladies to college, may, at first thought, strike every one, to whom this subject shall be proposed.

Chip of Fools
August 20, 1984

Before rushing blindly into the computer age, we need to remind ourselves that events have already falsified most of the predictions about “postindust

Art and Apartheid
April 09, 1984

J.M. Coetzee on Athol Fugard.

The Fascination of Henry Adams
August 01, 1983

Adams after his death in 1918 was to emerge as one of his century’s recovered modernists—like Whitman, Melville, Dickinson.

The Fascination of Henry Adams
August 01, 1983

The voluminous Adams papers now being gradually published by the Massachusetts Historical Society are a national archive in themselves. These magnific

The Spell of Fagin
June 20, 1983

Oliver Twist can attract and hold almost every kind of imagination, since its main figures—the defenseless waif, the devilish fence, the unctuous bead

A Keynes for All Seasons
June 20, 1983

Had Keynes chosen to play the establishment game, he almost surely would have succeeded Alfred Marshall as the dominant academic authority of his gene

Sex Provided
February 23, 1982

Has nakedness ever been for people what it now is for us? This is an important and philosophical question. A woman undressing in a film made in 1919 r

Edmund Wilson in the 1930s
May 03, 1980

Wilson’s work as a reporter brought him much closer to the nation’s realities and he described these with his masterly concreteness.

Poetry
December 09, 1978

Never have so many written with such technical skill: this remark, as often an expression of frustration and dismay as of admiration, has become a commonplace of poetry criticism in the 1970s. Never, of course, have so many written. And published. And competed for a lamentably small audience: there are perhaps more writers than readers of poetry at the present time. In so diminished a sphere the consequences have been, and continue to be, predictable.

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