Books

The first penguin paperbacks—including titles by Ernest Hemingway, Agatha Christie, and André Maurois—were published on this day in 1935. At six pence each, they were the same price as a box of cigarettes and much cheaper than hardcovers. Mass-producing paperbacks popularized literature for a new class and fundamentally changed the printing industry. Below is a select visual history of the Penguin paperback.

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The paradox of writing about Jesus is that we can only form an idea of him from the scriptures, yet we can only evaluate the scriptures if we have an idea of what he must have been like.

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Orhan Pamuk explains the arrogance of Erdoğan, the riots in Taksim Square, and why the future of the novel lies in the East.

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An American Poet Outgrows Surrealism

The unhinged psalms of Dean Young

Dean Young is one of the most distinguished mid-career poets in America. His new book of new and selected poems shows how he has emerged from a dire medical condition to write the best poems of his life.

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A cosmic perspective lends form to Italo Calvino's idea of utopia.

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Aldous Huxley would have reached the ripe old age of 119 today. In his honor, we present a selection of his poetry as published in The New Republic.

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From the Stacks: "Why Coleridge?"

September 13, 1939

In honor of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, who died 174 years ago today, Kenneth Burke's 1939 essay lauding Coleridge as a great champion of idealism.

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 From The Green Man: Buy The Green Man, by Kingsley Amis, on Amazon.

How Gay Marriage Became Legitimate

A revisionist history of a social revolution

The courts have been lauded for boosting gay rights. Why cultural changes mattered more.

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On the 44th anniversary of Witold Gombrowicz's death, Polish writer Jaroslaw Anders's review of Gombrowicz's Trans-Atlantyk.

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