Boston University

The cradle of quarterbacks in the age of concussions.

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Today marks the official start to baseball season! Well, that’s not quite true. The Oakland Athletics and Seattle Mariners played a pair of untelevised games in Japan last week, the results of which remain unclear. And last night, the St. Louis Cardinals faced off against an unrecognizable team dressed in orange uniforms that has apparently been in the NL East for 20 years. In any event, many first pitches will be thrown today, and if we’re lucky, a few first retaliatory beanballs.

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Austin Frakt is a health economist at Boston University. He blogs at The Incidental Economist. During debate over and since passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), there has been some concern over whether the individual and employer mandate provisions will work.  Will employers drop coverage in large numbers once their workers can purchase insurance through exchanges?

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Austin Frakt is a health economist at Boston University. He blogs at The Incidental Economist. The expansion of coverage expected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is paid for in large part by anticipated massive savings from cuts to Medicare. It’s amazing that all that fat was sitting around in the Medicare program–adjustments to hospital reimbursements, reductions in over-payments to private Medicare plans (Medicare Advantage).

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Austin Frakt is a health economist at Boston University. He blogs at The Incidental Economist. Earlier this week Jennifer Haberkorn reported in Politico that Republicans plan to use their expected mid-term political mandate to choke off funding for provisions of the Affordable Care Act. Republicans would be able to deny funding only to the pieces of the law that require money from Congress. Doing so could create “Swiss cheese” out of the legislation, with some portions of the law already being funded and others not.

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Austin Frakt is a health economist at Boston University. He blogs at The Incidental Economist. Earlier this week the Obama Administration released a report that described savings to the Medicare program that are predicted to follow from changes mandated by the Affordable Care Act.

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Austin Frakt is a health economist at Boston University. He blogs at The Incidental Economist, which he created. The purposes of comprehensive health reform are noble: expansion of coverage and control of costs. Yet, the latest attempt to begin to address those goals is near death. For nearly a year Democrats shepherded bills through the complex legislative process, revising and merging them to accommodate the congressional process and political realities.

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In "Is The A Middle Way?" in the latest issue of TNR, Stephen Biddle argues that half-measures in Afghanistan will ultimately fail.  Today, two experts in the field, The New America Foundation's Michael A. Cohen and Boston University professor Andrew J. Bacevich, respond. Click here to read Stephen Biddle's original piece on the need for a full counterinsurgency strategy in Afghanistan. Click here to read Michael A. Cohen suggest that there are more options for how to fight in Afghanistan than Biddle acknowledges. Click here to read Andrew J.

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Half Tame

The time has come to take a fresh look at the achievement of Roger Shattuck, who died in 2005 at the age of eighty-two. From his first book, The Banquet Years, published exactly half a century ago, to his last major work, Forbidden Knowledge, Shattuck was one of America's most adventuresome students of modernity, at once a celebrant of some of the wildest reaches of artistic experiment and a critic of the twentieth century's dream of unlimited, ever- expanding horizons.

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The Operator

On May 28, George Tenet delivered for the Bush administration. Nearly two months had passed since the fall of Baghdad. U.S. forces had turned up no weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in Iraq, raising the specter of gross misjudgment on the part of the U.S. intelligence community and allegations of presidential dishonesty. But, that day, the CIA announced that two trailers found in northern Iraq the previous month were actually mobile biological-agent production facilities.

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