Brasilia

The Brazil Protests Are Really About the Right to the City
June 21, 2013

The protests in Brazil, which have lasted a couple weeks and yesterday drew more than one million to the streets of the cities, are about a lot of things: the rising cost of living, corruption, mistreatment by police.

The Literary Insecurities of Washington, D.C.
January 15, 2013

The Post's list of D.C.'s best books "has the ungainly feel of trying too hard and protesting too much."

Canada and Its Tar Sands: What the Country Can Learn From Brazil About Protecting the Environment
June 27, 2011

In 1986, the then-editor of The New Republic, Michael Kinsley, famously asked whether anyone could find a headline more boring than “Worthwhile Canadian Initiative,” which had recently appeared on the Times op-ed page. The jibe was really a backhanded compliment, of course—Canada’s virtue was so automatic it could just be assumed. It was big news in Canada when, in 2008, the country slipped from the top-ten list of the world’s most peaceful countries (all the way to eleventh). By this year, it was back in eighth, 74 places above the U.S. and, when liberals in the U.S.

Picturing Buildings
April 11, 2011

What does a photograph reveal and not reveal about a building? However consequential the question used to be, the Internet has become a seductive digitized world of photo stills and slideshows from which one might infer that actual knowledge—factual information—has been obtained. But buildings are real, indeed, real things that everyone needs and nearly everyone constantly uses. More or less reliably, too, a building stays put, at least until a tsunami hits or, more typically, someone comes along and tears it down.

DISPUTATIONS: Misunderstanding the Problem
December 29, 2009

Jorge Castañeda’s lament ("Adios, Monroe Doctrine," December 28, 2009) about U.S. indifference towards Latin America sounds a familiar theme. His claim that “the United States doesn’t seem to care much what happens in Latin America” has been a constant refrain that has dominated analyses of U.S. regional policy since the mid-1970s. The “new passivity” is not, after all, terribly new.   Though often framed in general terms of advancing national interests and values, almost everyone expressing such a lament has been motivated by some particular agenda. Some want the U.S.