Breaking Bad

On the twenty-fifth anniversary of "Twin Peaks"'s premiere, what does it reveal about our ongoing fascination with a dead girl's body? 

READ MORE >>

We think we have a handle on LBJ—the raw ambition, the animal physicality, the gaping insecurities—but for the most part, we’re just redrawing the cartoon.

READ MORE >>

"The Good Wife" doesn't need to kill beloved characters to be better than "Game of Thrones." It already is. 

READ MORE >>

How To Tell The New Spanish "Breaking Bad" From The Original

A Bicultural Viewer's Guide

*/ In the current issue of the magazine, Laura Bennett wrote about the making of "Metástasis," the Spanish-language adaptation of "Breaking Bad" that will air later this year on networks across Latin America, as well as on Univision's UniMás in the States.

READ MORE >>

Meet Walter Blanco

Behind the scenes of 'Breaking Bad' en español

How do you say "meth kingpin" in Spanish?

READ MORE >>

Highlights from an eventful year in television.

READ MORE >>

In their conversation about Episode 3 of Homeland, New Republic Senior Editor Isaac Chotiner and former CIA man Robert Baer discuss the way the Agency exerts psychological control over its agents, and whether the show is becoming more like "Breaking Bad."Isaac Chotiner: Did you notice that this episode had a lot of spy-movie clichés? The first was the guy waking up in bed not knowing where he is. I suppose I should ask whether that has ever happened to you.

READ MORE >>

    Four years ago, I wrote a New Republic piece about the magic of local television news—and how that magic had achieved its greatest form in Philadelphia, where a paucity of real celebrities means local-TV anchors are treated like celebrities. 

READ MORE >>

Everything happened as it should on last night’s “Breaking Bad” finale. The Nazis went down in a blaze of machine gun fire, Jesse escaped, Gretchen and Elliot were jolted out of their smugness, Walt copped to his own terrible selfishness in a final conversation with his wife. For a show that makes a point of not giving viewers exactly what they want or expect, the finale was uncharacteristically satisfying. There was no gut clench as the credits rolled, no wave of disgust for humanity—just a sense of inevitability and relief.

READ MORE >>

There’s a scene toward the end of the first episode of Showtime’s new drama “Masters of Sex” in which two test subjects embrace on a bed in a hospital laboratory. Bill Masters and Virginia Johnson, the real-life sex researchers from St. Louis’s Washington University who performed trailblazing studies on human subjects in the years before the sexual revolution, watch silently through a pane of glass. A scroll of paper charting the subjects’ heart rates unspools onto the floor nearby.

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR