Chuck Schumer

Interview: The New York Senator on Ted Cruz, Elizabeth Warren, and Wall Street 

READ MORE >>

Why Liberals Should Oppose the Immigration Bill

It's about low-wage American workers

The consensus among decent people in favor of the immigration bill making its way through Congress is so firm that expressing dissent feels a bit like taking the floor to suggest we chop down the Redwood National Park. People don’t want to hear it, and they also think you’re a nut. That makes this article one of the hardest I’ve ever had to write. It’s not that I’m afraid people will get angry; it’s that I can’t imagine anyone on my side (liberal) is open to persuasion.

READ MORE >>

Schumer's support for Hagel seems like another setback for the pro-Israel lobby. Or is it?

READ MORE >>

Mitt Romney's greatest gift of all to Democrats was clarying which party is on whose side. That wasn't so obvious to voters two years ago.

READ MORE >>

The Democrats won. Now Wall Street needs them more than ever.

READ MORE >>

When Mitt Romney won the first debate, it was trumpeted as an epic event; when he lost the next two, not so much. What gives?

READ MORE >>

In the ongoing melodrama between Democrats and Wall Street, few characters are more compelling than Chuck Schumer. New York’s senior senator has a well-cultivated reputation as the financial world’s top wing man in Washington, at least among Democrats. But since he also hopes to lead his august chamber one day, he’s charted a more ecumenical path of late.

READ MORE >>

 ... Sen. Chuck Schumer, D.-N.Y., says Democrats will focus "like a laser" on the issue in 2012. True, Schumer seems more interested in the stagnation of middle incomes (median income declined during the last decade) than in the "upper tail" phenomenon of the top 1 percent, 0.1 percent, and 0.01 percent doubling and tripling their share of the national income  since 1979. The latter trends have a lot to do with the financialization of the U.S. economy and lax regulation of Wall Street, and Schumer has long been one of Wall Street's most loyal defenders on Capitol Hill.

READ MORE >>

It’s a choice between “kids’ safety” and “tax breaks for corporate jets” according to President Obama’s clearest explanation of the budget showdown in a press conference last Wednesday. The Republicans’ staggering refusal to consider even the most minimal efforts to close tax loopholes—because it would cross the line of their blood-oath to tax lobbyist Grover Norquist—was boiled down to the tangible phrase, repeated six times, “corporate jets.” The reaction, especially but not exclusively on the right, was disparaging. It was simultaneously “class warfare” and futile.

READ MORE >>

[Guest post by Matthew Zeitlin] Ryan Grim has been doing a great job at the Huffington Post tracking how Senate Democrats are starting to consider the constitutional option when it comes to the debt ceiling. The constitutional option, what Chait calls the “Zeitlin Option,” is for Obama to instruct Treasury to ignore the debt ceiling and continue to honor the government’s obligations to creditors and to fund appropriations and entitlements, arguing that the debt ceiling is unconstitutional under the 14th amendment.

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR