Clinton

The Ricochet Smear
and
January 18, 2007

A while back I predicted that conservatives would shamelessly smear Barack Obama and then blame the smearing on Hillary Clinton. Today I saw this article (via the Corner) about Obama from the conservative magazine Insight, which breathlessly asks: Are the American people ready for an elected president who was educated in a Madrassa as a young boy and has not been forthcoming about his Muslim heritage? Of course, it's not Insight asking this question, the article goes on to explain, it's Hillary. The article continues: An investigation of Mr.

How's That Again?
and
January 05, 2007

The AP got an advance copy of Terry McAuliffe's new memoir--which is apparently chock full o' political gossip. According to the AP, McAuliffe really goes to town on John Kerry, deeming his presidential campaign "one of the biggest acts of political malpractice in the history of American politics." But there's one thing in the AP precis of the book that confuses me: McAuliffe said Republicans told him they were shocked that Kerry just took the attacks on his military record, but also overjoyed.

Kiss Me, Cato
December 25, 2006

Chait: No, progressives shouldn't.

Dick Morris, Cont'd
and
December 19, 2006

Jason, I think your item on Dick Morris implicitly raises this very point, but I'd just note more explicitly that--despite all his braying--a Hillary candidacy is the best thing that could happen to the man. About half of his public persona, it seems to me, is based on his status as a former Clinton insider who bashes the Clintons. Once they're gone, he loses an awful lot of his man-bites-dog cachet.... --Michael Crowley

Against the veto.
October 09, 2006

This summer, President Bush issued a veto for the first time. The occasion: a bill--passed by wide but not veto-proof majorities in the House and Senate-- that would have expanded federal funding of stem-cell research. Following Bush's announcement, liberals, predictably, denounced his move as a capitulation to the religious right, while conservatives, just as predictably, lauded his commitment to the sanctity of life.

American Catholicism
October 09, 2006

Monday, October 9 Dear Damon, On your blog, which you've recently shut down, you posted links to two diametrically opposed reviews of your new book, The Theocons: Secular America Under Siege. One, by Adrian Wooldridge in The New York Times, calls your tone "admirably restrained, dispassionate and scholarly when it could so easily have been rank and recriminatory." The other, by Commonweal Editor Paul Baumann, accuses you of being "exaggerated and alarmist," not to mention "tendentious" and "frequently cartoonish" in your portrait of your former compatriots on the religious right.

Thomas Pain
August 07, 2006

Last April, when comedian Stephen Colbert appeared before the White House Correspondents' Association dinner and memorably lacerated the assembled reporters for having spent much of the last five years as lazy courtiers for the Bush administration, h

Mother Load
May 01, 2006

Forget robins, daffodils, and tax returns--it wouldn't be spring without a new skirmish in the perennial "mommy wars." By now, we all know the combatants: On one side, the self-righteous stay-at-home mom who has "opted out" of the workplace to spend her days mashing bananas; on the other, the harried career drone who barely blows her babe a kiss as she sprints out of the day care center.

Moral Imperative
March 20, 2006

The case for universal health care.

Shooting Blanks
January 01, 2006

It's early December and Chris Cox, the NRA's chief lobbyist, is describing the exotic hunting trophies--from assorted skulls to giant warthog hooves that serve as bookends--that decorate his Capitol Hill office. "The Kudu. The Livingston Eland. The Blue Wildebeest," says Cox in his mellifluous Jackson, Tennessee, accent, ticking off the creatures he has downed. He pauses, then beams, "And the Cape Buffalo. It's one of the Big Five--one of the five most dangerous animals you can hunt in Africa."   But there's one recent kill that Cox isn't bragging about.

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