Conviction

Madoff Has Cancer, Too. Why Not Release Him or At Least Send Him Home on House Arrest?
August 24, 2009

The New York Post and Reuters both report not exactly that Bernie Madoff has cancer. But that he's told his fellow inmates that he has cancer, pancreatic cancer, at that. Which means that, if the tale is true, he'll be a goner soon, very soon. Unless there's a medical miracle, as sometimes there is even in such terrible afflictions of the pancreas. Now, a federal judge has sentenced Madoff to 150 years in federal prison, a sentence--as is obvious--he cannot possibly serve. So the master Ponzi schemer is now in the hands of the president as top man in the federal penal system.

A Sabotage of Justice: Our Inert Response to Libya's Terrorist Pep Rally
August 24, 2009

This was a matter of American interest. More than that: it was actually an American matter. And the contempt that Great Britain, particularly Scotland, and Libya have shown the United States in it is a fact with which we must conjure, lest this drama in four parts otherwise define, delimit and demean our very position in world affairs. This is a choice that neither Russia nor China ever seem to face. That is, they never stand down (or seem even to contemplate standing down) from what they deem to be core.

A Sabotage of Justice
August 24, 2009

This was a matter of American interest. More than that: it was actually an American matter. And the contempt that Great Britain, particularly Scotland, and Libya have shown the United States in it is a fact with which we must conjure, lest this drama in four parts otherwise define, delimit and demean our very position in world affairs. This is a choice that neither Russia nor China ever seem to face. That is, they never stand down (or seem even to contemplate standing down) from what they deem to be core.

The Troy Davis Case And Standards Of Review
August 18, 2009

The Supreme Court made waves yesterday with its nearly unprecedented decision to order a federal district court to conduct an evidentiary hearing into the case of Troy Davis, the Georgia man sentenced to death based largely on the testimony of eyewitnesses who have since recanted.

Abbas Milani's Speech In Support Of The Bahais
August 15, 2009

Abbas Milani is the Hamid and Christina Moghadam Director of Iranian Studies at Stanford, where he is the co-director of the Iran Democracy Project. His latest book is Eminent Persian: The Men and Women who Made Modern Iran, 1941-1979 (Syracuse University Press). This Tuesday, seven leaders of Iran's Bahai movement will go on trial on capital charges of espionage and threatening national security. They have been in prison for more than a year. The group's two lawyers have not only been refused the legally required visits with their clients, but neither will be in court on Tuesday.

Tnr On Aung San Suu Kyi
August 11, 2009

Burmese pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi has been sentenced to 18 more months of house arrest after having being found guilty of letting American citizen John Yettaw stay at her home for two nights in May. This morning, we went through the archives to find our best writing on the Nobel Prize-winning Suu Kyi. "Burmese Blaze" by Madeline K. Albright, December 4, 1995. Former Secretary of State Albright wrote this piece while she was the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations.

Mayor for Life
August 10, 2009

In the summer of 1990, I was 16 years old and working as an intern on Capitol Hill. As one might expect of a high school student who spends his summer vacation interning for a senator--rather than, say, working as a camp counselor or hanging out at the beach--I had a somewhat inflated view of my importance. I came to work early and stayed late, certain my presence was vital to the smooth running of government. But about halfway through the summer, I put in for a day off. My boss, probably thinking I was going to do something fun, eagerly granted it. Little did she know.

What Is Malcolm Gladwell Talking About (cont'd)?
August 04, 2009

Not to pile on Malcolm Gladwell (whom I generally like a bit more than Isaac), but his contrasting Atticus Finch--and his stoic response to Tom Robinson being found guilty--with Thurgood Marshall makes no sense. Gladwell writes: If Finch were a civil-rights hero, he would be brimming with rage at the unjust verdict. But he isn’t. He’s not Thurgood Marshall looking for racial salvation through the law. Did Marshall once ever launch an extra-judicial protest over a bad verdict?

And We Have Learned -- What? The Real Lesson After The Beer
August 02, 2009

So they had their beer. Teachable Moment. What have we learned? Something--but not what I sense will get much press in the aftermath. Directly from The Beer--not much. Gates and Crowley had an “exchange,” although about what we are not to know. And they intend to have more such exchange. Of some sort. All very civil. Gates has said he’ll be putting together a documentary about the profiling issue.

Jp Morgan Chase, Bernie Madoff's Unknowing Money Laundry, And Other Ancillary Tales
July 15, 2009

Edward Jay Epstein has been filling in the holes (three in recent weeks right here) in the saga of Bernard Madoff who, as a friend said to me the other day, was satanic enough to contribute money to charities from which he stole. One of the big lacunae was how Madoff did and hid his money laundering. Actually, it's not so complicated, as Edward Jay Epstein demonstrates below: Bernard Madoff did not merely plead guilty to running a multi-billion dollar Ponzi Scheme.

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