Cuba

Reporting on Cuba
July 08, 1967

Castro’s Cuba, Cuba’s Fidel by Lee Lockwood (Macmillan, $10) Inconsolable Memories by Edmund Desnoes (New American Library; $4.50) If only because we have had no reports from Cuba for a long time, Lee Lockwood’s book and Edmundo Desnoes’ novel are important. I am speaking of us Americans of course; Europeans go to Cuba and write about it; US-influenced Latin Americans less, but the visits of their leading writers to cultural conferences and their enthusiasm for the Cuban revolution make Havana the cultural capital of the Spanish-speaking world.

Setting Up the Scapegoat Who Will Be Blamed for Cuba?
March 13, 1961

For nearly 20 months a subcommittee of the Senate Committee on the Judiciary has been holding hearings, ostensibly on "the Communist threat to the United States through the Caribbean," presided over by James O. Eastland of Mississippi. He is assisted by Senators Dodd, Johnston of South Carolina, McClellan, Ervin, Hruska, Dirksen, Keating and Cotton. How many witnesses have been called has not been disclosed. The testimony of only a few has been released, and that has been edited before publication.

Correspondence
and
July 17, 1935

An Omen for America Sir: In the name of a group of Cuban revolutionary exiles I would like to call your attention to the following considerations: Cuba’s situation is not today being given the same consideration it has received in analogous circumstances in the past.

Correspondence
and
July 17, 1935

An Omen for America Sir: In the name of a group of Cuban revolutionary exiles I would like to call your attention to the following considerations: Cuba’s situation is not today being given the same consideration it has received in analogous circumstances in the past.

The Week
and
July 07, 1926

After leaving Pennsylvania, the next stop is Illinois! The searchlight of investigation is now to be turned on expenditures in the recent Senatorial primary in that state. The Senatorial committee which has been looking into the Pennsylvania orgy decided some time ago that as soon as Congress adjourns it will move to Chicago and continue its activities there. Since then Senator Caraway has made charges on the floor of the Senate which if confirmed will make the stigma attached to Illinois politicians quite as serious as that now clings to the Pennsylvanians.

The Whirling Pyramid
November 03, 1920

Omens these: In Paterson, the silk city, little third and fourth class shops are flooded with fine silks to be sold at any price; there has been a panic in silk. A year ago a butcher got $1.35 a pound for his raw calf hides and today he is lucky to get 25 cents; the bottom has fallen out of the leather market. The sign of the night rider appears in the South. The farming industry in convention at Washington demands unlimited federal credit to enable the South to sit on its cotton until the price is 40 cents again, and the West to hold its wheat for $3.00 a bushel; else all are ruined.

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