David

“The New Normal,” the latest sitcom from “Glee” creator Ryan Murphy, began stoking conservative outrage even before it aired. It was banned from NBC’s Salt Lake City affiliate; the Christian group One Million Moms blasted it for promoting the “decay of morals and values.” But it is hard, at first glance, to understand all the fuss.

READ MORE >>

The release of The Dark Knight Rises, and the return to the screen of Bruce Wayne, has reminded us that fictional rich men love playing politics just as much as real ones. Wayne and his moneyed pals, after all, helped fill the reelection coffers of hope-and-change district attorney Harvey Dent like it was a party at George Clooney’s house.

READ MORE >>

Royal Mess

In a critically and commercially disappointing year for the film industry, one of the few highlights has been the reception given to The King’s Speech. The movie has been nominated for just about every existing award, and a bevy of Oscar nominations are forthcoming. The period drama is also on its way to financial success. Like Stephen Frears’s film from 2006, The Queen—which won Helen Mirren an Oscar for her eponymous performance—The King’s Speech is a testament to Americans’ continuing fascination with the British Royal Family.

READ MORE >>

Qohelet

Chapter One, 1-9 The words of Qohelet son of David, king in Jerusalem. Merest breath, said Qohelet, merest breath.

READ MORE >>

The Financial Times is the six-day-a-week newspaper of the Pearson Publishing Group. It is, then, the sister of The Economist. Both are widely read, although the weekly magazine--that is, the latter journal--no longer has much competition in the English-speaking world. (And certainly not from Time or Newsweek.) Ten years ago, in a TNR piece about The Economist, Andrew Sullivan pointed out a particularly noxious passage in the magazine’s pages. Here’s what he wrote back then: Other vestigial Brittery abounds, including the usual condescension to Israel.

READ MORE >>

The verse is from Psalms 119, that is, King David, poet and hero. Robert Malley and Hussein Agha are (let me just to be polite say "adversaries" instead of) enemies of Israel. That is why they are so welcome in the New York Review of Books and, of course, on the op-ed page of the New York Times where their latest missive, "The Two-State Solution Doesn't Solve Anything," appeared on Tuesday. (The same piece was published simultaneously in the Guardian, the closest thing to a pro-jihadist publication in ordinary journalism.) While fronting as an academic at St.

READ MORE >>

Mr. Right?

The New Yorker is hardly the optimal vehicle for reaching the conservative intelligentsia. But, last year, Barack Obama cooperated with a profile for that magazine where he seemed to be speaking directly to the right.

READ MORE >>

Virtually Normal

Jerusalem In 2006, after the Lebanon war, Israel's foreign ministry decided that the country had a p.r. problem on its hands. The solution? Let the world know that Israel, far from being a place of war and terror, was in fact a land of sunny beaches and beautiful women: in other words, a country that was fundamentally normal. And, so, Israel retained the p.r.

READ MORE >>

God: A Biography By Jack Miles (Knopf, 446 pp., $27.50) The Postmodern Bible By The Bible and Culture Collective (Yale University Press, 416 pp., $35) Jack Miles is a learned and original critic. In an age in which such belletristic skills are commonly regarded as irrelevant or even harmful to the true business of criticism, he knows what it is to be a writer. Unusually gifted critics will sometimes choose to write peculiar books, and this is what Miles has done. A reviewer can hardly help being preoccupied with its oddity, but before yielding to that temptation he ought to say that God: A Bio

READ MORE >>

The Greeks would not have liked me. I am not an athlete. For though 1 run, I do not run to win. And worst of all, I go too far. In the Hellenic view of life, sport and culture were synonymous, but nonetheless they had no admiration for the distance man. He did not fire them to song, ln fact, of all the odes of Pindar, only one is dedicated to a winner in the dolichos, their longest race (about three miles). The sprinters and the horses got the lyrics. What is more, they laughed at us. The distance runner was the butt of countless jokes.

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR