David Cameron

Can William and Kate’s Wedding Really Save the British Economy?
November 27, 2010

In what seemed like a rare moment of complete political transparency, David Cameron stepped out of 10 Downing Street last week to tell us that his ministers had cheered and banged the cabinet table when he announced the news of Prince William's engagement. And cheer they might. Grim news has dominated headlines here lately: strikes, government cuts, rising unemployment, and falling house prices.

There Will Always Be An England
November 16, 2010

[Guest post by Isaac Chotiner] Sarah Lyall's New York Times write-up of the news that Prince William is engaged goes through the predictable handwringing over the bride-to-be's relatively "modest" upbringing before giving an account of how David Cameron and his cabinet reacted to the announcement. Prime Minister David Cameron said that when he announced the news, members of his cabinet responded with a “great cheer” and “banging of the table.”

Slashing Spending and Boosting Infrastructure in the U.K.
October 26, 2010

British Prime Minister David Cameron’s announcement last week of the U.K.’s plan to balance its books by slashing spending raised eyebrows across the globe. With an average drop of nearly 20 percent across all British agencies--from defense, to housing, to education--one commenter noted, “Little is spared.” But not everything was cut. Recognizing the “difficult decisions” that Britain has deferred in recent years, the prime minister followed up last week’s budget announcement with a major speech yesterday to the Confederation of British Industry (Britain’s rough equivalent of the U.S.

What the Chilean Miners and a Dead Scotswoman Tell Us About the Future of American Power
October 19, 2010

When a story about survival and life wipes another story about disaster and death off the news channels and front pages, it should be a cause for joy. The fate of the Chilean miners terrified, excited, and finally exhilarated billions of people like nothing else I can remember for years. It was the ultimate human-interest story, the happy ending beyond Hollywood’s most frantic dreams. No one planned that this should eclipse the death of Linda Norgrove, the 36-year-old British—more exactly Scottish, from the beautiful Hebridean island of Lewis—aid worker.

What Was David Cameron Thinking?
September 08, 2010

An article in The New York Times Magazine doesn’t becomes the big political story in London every week, but the Times piece “Tabloid Hack Attack on Royals, and Beyond” has been a front-pager and led on the TV news here. The tabloid in question is the News of the World, one of whose reporters was imprisoned a few years ago for “phone-hacking,” or intercepting cell phone calls, most notably from the two young princes, William and Harry. Although Andy Coulson, the editor of the paper at the time, was forced to leave his job, he denied any knowledge of malfeasance.

The Primary Differences
August 26, 2010

Washington—Republicans are in the midst of an insurrection. Democrats are not. This vast gulf between the situations of the two parties—not some grand revolt against "the establishment" or "incumbents"—explains the year's primary results, including Tuesday's jarring outcomes in Florida and Alaska. The agitation among Republicans is not surprising, given the trauma of the final years of George W. Bush's presidency.

Tory Story
August 12, 2010

On Friday, May 7, for the first time since 1974, we woke up the morning after the British election and didn’t know who our prime minister would be. No party had won an absolute majority, and so, for a period that a BBC-TV documentary has dubbed the "Five Days that Changed Britain," Nick Clegg, leader of the Liberal Democrats, held the balance of power and negotiated with Gordon Brown, who was still entrenched as prime minister, and the Conservative leader, David Cameron. Finally, the Tories cut a deal with Clegg.

Turkey Is Not Going to Join the E.U.
August 05, 2010

Turkey is not going to join the European Union. Bald or candid statements are usually unwise, or “impolitic,” which is why politicians tend to avoid them, knowing that they may be falsified by events. But some can be made with absolute confidence, and here is one of them. This question has returned to the news with the recent Turkish visit by David Cameron, during which he said that Turkey should join the E.U. as soon as possible. Whatever my new prime minister may say, it has been clear to me ever since I took any interest in the question that Turkey was not going to join the E.U.

Dumb Power
July 29, 2010

Washington–Can a nation remain a superpower if its internal politics are incorrigibly stupid? Start with taxes. In every other serious democracy, conservative political parties feel at least some obligation to match their tax policies with their spending plans. David Cameron, the new Conservative prime minister in Britain, is a leading example.  He recently offered a rather brutal budget that includes severe cutbacks.

O.K., The President May Have Difficulties With Europeans. But the American People Don't.
July 20, 2010

In any case, the nations with which Barack Obama seems to think he clicks are not especially respected (or liked) by the people he represents. And these presidentially favored nations don't really seem to respect either him or us. Basta with the Muslim orbit. Obama wants to run after Recip Tayyit Erdogan let him.   Frankly, I believe that the Anglophobia of the administration is a much over-estimated quantum. By the time you read this, moreover, the president and David Cameron will have had whatever set-to they were destined to have, or not to have.

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