David Cronenberg

Worthwhile Canadian Coolness
November 09, 2012

Canada, long considered the U.S.'s boring, denim-wearing neighbor, has become America's leading purveyor of cool.

Thomson on Films: The Oedipal Complexity of Early Psychoanalysis
January 02, 2012

A Dangerous Method is crammed with alarm and peril at the outset. A young, dark-featured woman in white is barely contained in a moving carriage in 1904—she is screaming, heaving, sighing—and she is being taken to a clinic just outside Zurich where she will become the patient of Dr Carl Jung. Outside the smart establishment, on what seems a fine day, she is carried inside still writhing like an eel on a cutting board. She turns out to be Sabina Spielrein, and she is played by Keira Knightley, not an actress who has carried me away in the past.

Russian Roulette
September 17, 2007

"I am driver," explains Viggo Mortensen early in David Cronenberg's Eastern Promises. "I go left. I go right. I go straight ahead. That's it." In fact, moviegoers should be pleased to know that the moral maneuvers undertaken by Mortensen's character, a low-level hood in London's Russian underworld, are considerably more interesting than advertised: swerves, veers, dips, even a u-turn or two. In structural terms, the protagonist of the film is a midwife played by Naomi Watts.

The Week In Film
and
September 14, 2007

In case anyone missed them, my take on Paul Haggis's In the Valley of Elah is here, and my thoughts on Julie Taymor's Across the Universe are here. But if you're trying to decide what movie to go to this weekend my strong recommendation would be David Cronenberg's Eastern Promises. My full review should be up tomorrow, but here's a short tease: "I am driver," explains Viggo Mortensen early in David Cronenberg's Eastern Promises. "I go left. I go right. I go straight ahead.

Uncertainty Principle
March 22, 2006

Violence is scary. Violence is sexy. Violence is wrong. Violence is righteous. Violence is a problem. Violence is the solution. Befitting its title, David Cronenberg's film A History of Violence comprises all these definitions and more. Just released on video, the film opens with a pulpy paean to small-town murderousness, as two drifters check out of a dusty, rural motel. The air of lazy depravity is palpable; bad acts are hinted at--"I had a little trouble with the maid," one man tells the other--before they are revealed.