David Kusnet

David Kusnet was chief speechwriter for former President Bill Clinton from 1992-1994. He is the author of Love the Work, Hate the Job: Why America’s Best Workers Are Unhappier than Ever.

READ MORE >>

David Kusnet was chief speechwriter for former President Bill Clinton from 1992 to 1994. He is the author of Love the Work, Hate the Job: Why America's Best Workers Are Unhappier than Ever.

READ MORE >>

David Kusnet was chief speechwriter for former President Bill Clinton from 1992 through 1994. He is the author of Love the Work, Hate the Job: Why America's Best Workers Are Unhappier than Ever (Wiley, 2008).   "I'm afraid Senator Obama doesn't understand the difference between a tactic and a strategy," John McCain said tonight in one of many attacks on his rival's maturity, judgment, and experience on national security issues.

READ MORE >>

A Much Needed Change

David Kusnet was chief speechwriter for former President Bill Clinton from 1992 through 1994. He is the author of Love the Work, Hate the Job: Why America's Best Workers Are Unhappier than Ever. Wednesday night produced a subtle but significant alteration in the Democrats' message.

READ MORE >>

David Kusnet was chief speechwriter for former President Bill Clinton from 1992 through 1994. He is the author of Love the Work, Hate the Job: Why America's Best Workers Are Unhappier than Ever. Before the 2004 Democratic convention, I drafted a speech for a client. Intent on running a "positive" campaign, John Kerry's message-meisters scrubbed the speech of even the mildest and most factual criticisms of the Bush Administration's record.

READ MORE >>

We asked David Kusnet, Bill Clinton's former chief speechwriter and author of Love the Work, Hate the Job: Why America's Best Workers Are Unhappier than Ever, to give his impression of Barack Obama's declaration of victory speech. Last night, Barack Obama's opponent was John McCain, not Hillary Clinton.

READ MORE >>

We asked former Bill Clinton speechwriter David Kusnet if today's plagiarism accusations against Barack Obama were justified. In his mind, was what Obama did acceptable, or a violation of speechmaking ethics? Here are his thoughts ...   Barack Obama’s greatest strength is the originality of his rhetoric.

READ MORE >>

Hey, we hear there's a primary today. Seems like as good a time as any to catch up on TNR's recent campaign coverage--there's Jon Chait's piece (now free to all!) on how Obama liberates Democrats from the Clinton's siege mentality; there's John Judis's CW-moving article, from mid-December, on how Latino voters could save Hillary's campaign; and there's David Kusnet, Bill Clinton's former speechwriter, on the perils John McCain will face in the general. There's also much more. To paraphrase P.

READ MORE >>

With so much hot primary action to keep up on tonight, you may have missed these posts: *John B.

READ MORE >>

Hard Labor

John Sweeney's name rarely appears in print without the word "militant" attached to it. Sweeney first gained national prominence in 1995, when, as president of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), he led striking janitors in a sit-in that blocked morning rush-hour traffic on Washington, D.C.'s Fourteenth Street Bridge for two hours. Later that year, Sweeney burnished his reputation as a confrontationalist by running (and winning) an insurgent campaign in the first-ever contested election for the presidency of the AFLl-CIO. Heavy-set and balding, Sweeney comes across like central c

READ MORE >>

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR