Department of Justice

Why wouldn't Fox's parent company tell the network that the Justice Department had searched the communications of one of a Fox reporter? 

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Do You Have the Right to Remain Silent?

The Obama administration's radical view of Miranda rights was in place well before Boston

The Obama administration has gone much further than the Bush administration in embracing new restrictions on Miranda rights

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Drone Strike Out

The Obama administration's drone strike memo is unconstitutional

The flimsy legal reasoning of the Obama administration's drone memo is unconstitutional.

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Unions Have High Hopes for Weed Workers

In marijuana, labor has found a growth industry. The Obama administration has other ideas.

In marijuana, labor has found a growth industry. The Obama administration has other ideas. 

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One of the most remarked-upon aspects of the upcoming Supreme Court challenge to California’s gay-marriage ban is the odd couple leading the charge: Ted Olson and David Boies, the conservative and liberal superlawyers who squared off in 2000 in Bush v. Gore. Much less is known, however, about the old friendship between Olson and their opponent in this case, Charles Cooper, one of the many lawyers who helped Olson on Bush v. Gore. Cooper and Olson are both part of Washington’s tiny tribe of top-flight conservative litigators. Given their similar resumes, it is odd to find them on opposite sides of one of the most politically contentious Supreme Court cases of the 21st century. When Olson and Cooper face off before the court in late March, they’ll not only be debating gay rights, but the nature of conservatism itself.Cooper, known in Washington as “Chuck,” is from Alabama, and he’s best known for his starched French-cuffed shirts and genteel southern formality. His way of speaking, once described by Washington Post columnist Mary McGrory as “Victorian copy book prose,” can come across as impressive or a little unctuous, depending on the listener. If Olson, who also has a flair for oral arguments, is the lawyer who argues before the court this spring, he and Cooper will be evenly matched. 

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Why the Justice Department let HSBC get away with criminal conduct.

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If marijuana advocates have come down at all since last month's victories in Colorado and Washington, then a couple of recent national polls should give them another lift. New surveys by CBS News and Quinnipiac show 47 to 51 percent of Americans supporting legalization, with between 44 and 47 percent opposed. This is good news for liberals, but not necessarily for President Obama. After all, both the Washington and Colorado laws expressly contradict the Controlled Substances Act, which President Obama is supposed to enforce.

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Washington state ain't no Canada or Amsterdam. In fact, as of yesterday, it's even more liberal.

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There's almost no legal precedent for how to deal with electoral fallout from a storm.

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If you’ve ever watched a television series, like “Hill Street Blues” or “NYPD Blue,” you are probably well acquainted with the mutual disdain between local and federal law enforcement. While the script for these shows was predictable, it was engrossing nonetheless. Cops were local bumpkins who policed on gut instinct, and whose ties to locals made corruption an ever-present danger. Feds were arrogant ‘suits’ who used wiretaps and hi-tech devices to drag in dozens at a time—cops included.

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