Detroit

Crimetown USA
July 10, 2000

David Grann reports on the small-town mafia capital in Ohio and the FBI agent that became obsessed with taking it down.

Improbable Cause
February 28, 2000

McCain’s 2000 campaign tries to beat Bush's "Michigan firewall."

Dead Man Walking
October 18, 1998

It seems like a natural audience for a Democratic candidate. A few hundred retired union workers are sitting on folding chairs in a large hall that resembles a cafeteria at a run-down school-- right down to the off-white walls lined with tan cement columns. Outside, several letters have fallen off the billboard so that it reads, "united ood & commercia workers ufw local no.

The Closing of the American City
May 11, 1998

From 1998, Wilson reviews books on integration and the impact of the Rodney King incident.

California, Here They Come
August 19, 1996

Before rejoining the Dole campaign I fly with my friend Barbara Feinman to Detroit. I have made a deal with myself, as an incentive to get out of bed in the morning. For every three days I spend with Bob Dole I will allow myself a day with someone who is not Bob Dole. Normally, I would have waited until I had earned the reward to collect it. But circumstances--namely Barbara--intervened. Until a few months ago Barbara was happily making a living helping famous Washingtonians—Ben Bradlee, Bob Woodward, a pride of senators—write their books.

One Nation Under a Groove
July 15, 1991

  I.   My dream was to become Frank Sinatra. I loved his phrasing, especially when he was very young and pure….

How Buildings Remember
August 28, 1989

“Did you see the gas vans?” Claude Lanzmann asks Mrs. Michelsohn, an old German woman, in his film Shoah. Mrs. Michelsohn lived in Chelmno, 50 yards from the spot where Jews were loaded onto the vans at the Nazi extermination center. “No,” she answers at first, with a look of annoyance. Then her face registers the recognition that Lanzmann and his movie cameras will not be deflected. “Yes,” she acknowledges, she saw the vans, “from the outside. They shuttled back and forth. I never looked inside; I didn’t see the Jews in them.

The Triumph of Asian-Americans
July 15, 1985

David A. Bell: How one group of immigrants found its place in America.

The Iacocca Mystique
July 16, 1984

Something about Lee Iacocca inspires exaggeration. Twenty years ago, as general manager of Ford, he made the cover of both Time and Newsweek with his hot new car, the Mustang. Time began its story this way, Iacocca in the driver’s seat: The trim white car rolled restlessly through the winding roads of Bloomtield Hills, like a high-strung pony dancing to get started on its morning run … The driver of a Volkswagen raised his fingers in a V-for-victory sign. As the car picked up speed and headed southward toward Detroit, a flickering trace of satisfaction crossed its driver’s hawklike face.

In Strange Company
April 21, 1982

Has Niebuhr-mania gone too far?

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