Development

Welcome to the Traffic Capital of the World
What I learned from the crippling gridlock in Dhaka, Bangladesh
July 02, 2014

There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

Photos: Street Life in the Traffic Capital of the World
July 02, 2014

Pictures from the world's fastest-growing city.

From the Stacks: “Midnight’s Children”
May 23, 1981
August 15, 2013

Salman Rushdie's legendary novel Midnight's Children was set on this very day—an opportune time to republish The New Republic's 1981 review of the book.

D.C. Could Use More Donald
Trump's luxury hotel downtown is a good deal for the city, but why stop there?
April 10, 2013

Trump's luxury hotel downtown is a good deal for the city, but why stop there?

Creative Destruction
November 12, 2007

The best case against universal health care.

Health Care Special Issue: Creative Destruction
November 12, 2007

More than a decade ago, Michael Kinsley, the journalist and former editor of this magazine, developed Parkinson's disease--a degenerative condition that impairs motor and speech control, producing tremors, rigidity, and eventually severe disability. While the standard regimen of medications helped, he knew that his symptoms were bound to get steadily worse with time. He needed something better--something innovative--before the disease really progressed. In 2006, he got it at the famed Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. The treatment Mike received is called Deep Brain Stimulation, or DBS for short.