Europe

Which Languages Should Liberal Arts Be About in 2010?
December 13, 2010

We are to bemoan that universities across the country are eliminating or scaling back their foreign language departments. Or, what seems to arouse critics most is the disappearance of French, German, and Italian departments—what with Goethe, Balzac and Dante being pillars of a liberal arts education and so on. Yet, former French major and great fan of foreign language learning as I am, I’m not feeling as bad about this new trend as I am supposed to. I have as deep-seated a sense as anyone that an educated person is supposed to be able to at least fake a conversation in French.

Being Winston Churchill
December 08, 2010

Seventy years ago, in the summer and fall of 1940, Western civilization teetered in the balance as Britain stood alone against Nazi-controlled Europe. Other major world powers did not lend aid; Russia supported Germany, and the United States remained neutral. After Britain resisted the assault of Nazi bombers, in what was dubbed the “Battle of Britain,” the country was saved and German momentum stymied. The whole course of the war then radically shifted.

The Charnel Continent
December 02, 2010

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler And Stalin By Timothy Snyder (Basic Books, 524 pp., $29.95) ‘Now we will live!’... the hungry little boy liked to say ... but the food that he saw was only in his imagination.” So the little boy died, together with three million fellow Ukrainians, in the mass starvation that Stalin created in 1933. “I will meet her ... under the ground,” a young Soviet man said about his wife. Both were shot in the course of Stalin’s Great Terror of 1937 and 1938, which claimed 700,000 victims.

As If We Needed Any More Proof That Obama's Courting of Turkey Was Another in His String of Failures
December 01, 2010

The courting was actually of Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the personification of the new Turkey. And it wasn't as if Erdogan was an unknown quantity. In this morning's Financial Times, Daniel Dombey and Delphine Strauss report (through the horrible graces of WikiLeaks) that Eric Edelman, former U.S. ambassador in Ankara, had "described Mr.

Global Growth on the Orient Express
December 01, 2010

In the wake of the Great Recession, the recovery in U.S.

The Irony of Wikileaks
December 01, 2010

There’s no question that many of the Wikileaks documents are a great read. These diplomatic conversations between American officials and leaders from the Arab world, China, and Europe provide important insights about the subtleties of U.S. policy and the complexities of dealing with different personalities and governments around the world. But the disclosures are not just interesting; they are also ironic. That’s because they undermine the very worldview that Julian Assange and his colleagues at Wikileaks almost certainly support.

Abracadabra: A Brand New Arab Identity Via Andy Warhol, The Guggenheim, And Frank Gehry
November 27, 2010

The most intriguing and intricate cultural history I have read is Simon Schama’s The Embarrassment of Riches: An Interpretation of Dutch Culture in the Golden Age. There are many lessons in it, one of them that enormous wealth brings both opportunity and confusion, even—surprise!—also deterioration. This was what finally happened to Holland, and it happened also to Spain and Venice—three of the once richest and most powerful polities of Europe.

Ireland Then and Now
November 22, 2010

It was not long ago that Ireland was every American conservative's beau ideal of a European state. Low taxes, low regulation, it was the operfect case study in the success of free market policies. Former AEI fellow, and head of Bush's Domestic Policy Council, Karl Zinsmeister, October 5, 2000: One exception to Europe's tepid economic performance has been the Irish. Ireland -- which I visit regularly, including this summer -- is an economy on fire. As recently as the late 1970s, when I attended college in Dublin, the country was still a kind of developing nation.

Douthat's Unconvincing Defense Of GOP Fiscal Seriousness
November 16, 2010

Ross Douthat writes that the reaction to the debt commission shows that Republicans take the deficit more seriously than Democrats: Last week’s media coverage sometimes made it sound as if Bowles and Simpson were taking the same amount of fire from left and right. But the reaction from Republican lawmakers and the conservative intelligentsia was muted, respectful and often favorable; the right-wing griping mostly came from single-issue activists and know-nothing television entertainers.

Let's Talk About Sex
October 28, 2010

  As any visitor to Europe can attest, attitudes about sex over there are a lot different than attitudes about sex over here. All you have to do is turn on a television, open a newspaper, or walk through a train station and look at the billboards. Messaging about safe sex is not only more common. It's also a lot more explicit. Rachel Phelps has collected some examples of these ads in a slideshow at Slate (starting with the image above). And she thinks they make a difference: In both Europe and America, the age at which most people start having sex is 17.

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