General Motors

The Normal Person of Tomorrow
May 20, 1996

Ralph Nader makes his mark on the 1996 campaign.

Can Labor Come Back?
May 23, 1994

The recent Teamsters strike, The Los Angeles Times declared, "has served as a reminder of how much the union's influence has waned." The outcome, The New York Times wrote, showed how the union's "power has shrunk." There is some truth in these statements, but they reveal more about the national press's attitude toward labor than about the Teamsters union. During the twenty-four-day strike, the longest in Teamster history and the first since 1979, the union achieved almost 100 percent support from its rank and file, in spite of violent dissension in its upper ranks. In the provisional settlemen

The Mission
July 06, 1992

Ross Perot lives on Strait Lane in a world of his own. On the most exclusive street of millionaires in North Dallas, he has surrounded himself with alarms and sensors, fences and security guards. He has frequently deployed private investigators to uncover personally discrediting material about competitors. Those determined to humiliate and destroy him, he has explained, publicly and privately, include terrorists, drug lords, the CIA, and a criminal cabal of high officials in the Reagan and Bush administrations in which the president of the United States is complicit.

Confessions of a 'Contra'
August 05, 1985

How the CIA masterminded the Nicaraguan insurgency.

The Iacocca Mystique
July 16, 1984

Something about Lee Iacocca inspires exaggeration. Twenty years ago, as general manager of Ford, he made the cover of both Time and Newsweek with his hot new car, the Mustang. Time began its story this way, Iacocca in the driver’s seat: The trim white car rolled restlessly through the winding roads of Bloomtield Hills, like a high-strung pony dancing to get started on its morning run … The driver of a Volkswagen raised his fingers in a V-for-victory sign. As the car picked up speed and headed southward toward Detroit, a flickering trace of satisfaction crossed its driver’s hawklike face.

The Mystery of the Free Lunch
May 23, 1981

Michael Kinsley on swanky business expenses.

Cloud Nine
and
October 31, 1970

The pursuit of happiness shapes our manufacture and consumption, work and leisure, conservation and despoliation - activities which can’t go on freely and simultaneously without colliding. You can’t cut a redwood and enjoy its natural majesty, too.

He’s a Happening
April 01, 1966

Robert Kennedy is on to something. He hovers over it like a pig in the Perigord sniffing a truffle. It is just below the surface; he can't quite see it; he doesn't know its size or shape or worth or even what it's called. He only knows it's there, and he is going to get it. Where does he look? Among the grape-pickers on strike in central California, in Cloth Market Square in Cracow, on the Ole Miss campus, in a Senate hearing room. And always with the same single-minded, almost frightening intensity.

A $500 Million Mistake
September 26, 1964

On the first of July American Telephone and Telegraph, the largest business on earth, announced new records in net income ($x.6 billion) earned over the year ending May 31. In issuing this cheerful news the head officer of the company took time out to mention a small cloud across the rainbow. Three weeks before, on June 11, the California Public Utilities Commission had ordered a sharp reduction in the future profits of the company’s subsidiary in that state.

Romney and the Republicans
March 05, 1962

Selig S. Harrison's 1962 profile of Republican candidate George Romney's plans for the Republican party.

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