George W. Bush

State of the Union
May 08, 2000

TNR has always tried to be ahead of the curve. In 2000, when Vermont legalized civil unions for same-sex couples, former TNR editor Andrew Sullivan wrote a persuasive, prescient article arguing instead for full marriage equality. Addressing his essay to sympathetic liberals who generally supported gay rights but were wary of marriage quality, Sullivan wrote, “[S]upporting civil union while opposing marriage is an incoherent position--based more on sentiment than on reason, more on prejudice than principle.

Pool Sharks
May 01, 2000

The April 11 press release touting George W. Bush's new health care plan promoted it as evidence of the Texas governor's heartfelt commitment to helping "families caught between poverty and prosperity." But the attached "contact list" hinted at a different sort of commitment. Usually such lists are stocked with think tankers and academics. On this one, four of the five contacts came from two lobbies representing small business: the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Federation of Independent Business (nfib). This was no fluke.

Race Against Himself
March 13, 2000

David Grann explores the psychology behind John McCain's 2000 presidential campaign.

Upwardly Mobile
March 06, 2000

Hanna Rosin's 2000 look at the aspirations of George W. Bush voters in South Carolina.

Improbable Cause
February 28, 2000

McCain’s 2000 campaign tries to beat Bush's "Michigan firewall."

Ghosts
February 21, 2000

David Grann examines George W. Bush’s scorched-earth tactics against John McCain in the 2000 South Carolina primary.

They Only Look Alive
February 14, 2000

TNR Editors on the real winners of the 2000 primary.

The Granite Shifts
February 07, 2000

Jonathan Cohn explains how New Hampshire learned to love the government in 2000.

Ice Capades
February 07, 2000

Michelle Cottle on the 2000 Iowa Caucuses.

This Man Is Not A Republican
January 26, 2000

Something strange is happening to John McCain. For a long, long time, he was a pretty typical conservative. Sure, his style was eccentric--he made impolitic remarks about his own party and pointed out the hypocrisies on both sides of the aisle. And, sure, he broke with the GOP leadership on a couple of high-profile issues--campaign finance reform, tobacco taxes. McCain's truth-telling and his war against soft money made him a hero to the liberal press.

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