George Washington

TNR's Founding Fathers Spectacular
and
July 03, 2009

Throughout its 95-year history, The New Republic has featured the work of countless renowned historians on America's founding fathers. For the Fourth of July, we dug up our best book reviews, historical essays, and mini-biographies on the founders. Here are some of the highlights: Charles A.

Why'd Obama Talk About George Washington?
January 20, 2009

I was totally fascinated that Obama chose George Washington as the touchstone American-history figure in his inaugural. This was not an obvious choice. Lincoln, FDR, or even MLK would have been. But ol' sterile, ancient, powder-wigged, pink-cheeked George -- who's ever thought of him past fifth-grade history class, or perhaps fleetingly, when you look at a quarter?

Death Defying
October 22, 2008

'This election," said John McCain's campaign manager, Rick Davis, on the second day of the Republican convention, "is not about issues." And he meant it. The convention that Davis helped assemble devoted strikingly little time to policy. Instead, the focus was on McCain's biography. Fred Thompson set the tone early in the convention, using his address to recount McCain's life story, especially his stint as a prisoner of war. In state delegation meetings during the week, the campaign enlisted the candidate's fellow POWs to tell delegates of his experiences in Vietnam.

Parent Trap
July 02, 2007

Jon Cohn on how Mitt Romney un-became his father.

The Abolition Of Torture
December 19, 2005

Why is torture wrong? It may seem like an obvious question, or even one beneath discussion. But it is now inescapably before us, with the introduction of the McCain Amendment banning all "cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment" of detainees by American soldiers and CIA operatives anywhere in the world. The amendment lies in legislative limbo.

The Man Who Would Not Be King
December 20, 2004

HIS EXCELLENCYGEORGE WASHINGTON By Joseph J. Ellis (Alfred A. Knopf, 320 pp., $26.95) GILBERT STUARD(Metropolitan Museum of Art) Everyone keeps wondering why over the past decade or so there have been so many books on the Founders, that remarkable generation of men who led the American Revolution and framed the Constitution. Joseph J. Ellis is surely one of the explanations: he has been a one-man historical machine.

Freedoms and Feelings
April 07, 2003

I. The Passions of Andrew Jackson by Andrew Burstein (Alfred A. Knopf, 292 pp., $25) Early in 1834, at the height of his war with the Second Bank of the United States, President Andrew Jackson received at the White House several deputations of businessmen, who pleaded with him to change course. Believing that the Bank was an unrepublican, unaccountable monopoly, Jackson had vetoed its federal recharter and ordered the government's deposits in it removed.

America Made Easy
July 02, 2001

John Adams By David McCullough (Simon & Schuster, 751 pp., $35) I. At the height of the XYZ Affair in 1798, when American public outrage against France verged on war hysteria, President John Adams briefly enjoyed the sort of popular acclaim that he had long thought he deserved. In Paris, the French foreign minister Talleyrand had tried to bribe three American envoys sent by Adams to negotiate an end to continuing maritime hostilities between the two erstwhile allies.

The Hero Myth
May 24, 1999

David Grann profiles then U.S. Republican Presidential candidate, John McCain.

Byrd Brain
January 17, 1999

These days you can barely walk down the street in Washington without being accosted by some Wise Man hawking scandal advice. Former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole is selling his complicated censure scheme. Former Presidents Jimmy Carter and Gerald Ford are marketing their own censure proposal. Sundry other formers—Lloyd Cutler, Richard Ben-Veniste, Robert Drinan—have weighed in authoritatively as well. Now that Bimbroglio has graduated to the Senate, it's not surprising that these old lions (or perhaps "old badgers") have been joined by Democratic Senator Robert C.

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