Georgia

When Governor Jan Brewer signed S.B. 1070—Arizona’s notorious immigration law—in 2010, she didn’t just enact what was, at the time, the harshest immigration regime in the United States; she also inspired copycat bills in a number of other states. But with the Supreme Court set to consider the constitutionality of Arizona’s law—oral arguments for Arizona v. United States will be heard on Wednesday, and the Court’s decision is expected by the end of June—there’s a lot more at stake than the fate of S.B. 1070 and its imitators.

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The 2012 Masters Tournament is under way, and in keeping with The Study’s longstanding interest in sports economics, it’s time to ask: Besides controversy, what does the PGA’s annual trip to Augusta produce? According to a 2003 analysis, the Masters represents a substantial payday for the state of Georgia. But the Masters is just part of the golf industry in Georgia, which includes over 400 courses and clubs as well as a substantial manufacturing component (the vast majority of all golf carts are produced in the state).

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If X, Then Why?

Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention By Manning Marable (Viking Press, 594 pp., $30) I. When Malcolm X died in a hail of assassin’s gunfire at the Audubon Ballroom in February 1965, the mainstream media in the United States was quick to suggest that he reaped the harvest of bloodshed he had brazenly sown.

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Every campaign season has nauseating moments, but this is a standout: An anti-Obama bumper sticker which has gone viral—and which warns voters not to “Re-Nig” this time around. Forbes managed to get an interview with the sticker’s vendor, who made the incredible claim that her product is not racist. “According to the dictionary [the N word] does not mean black,” said Paula Smith of Hinesville, Georgia.

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After just barely pulling out a win in Ohio, Mitt Romney has “won Super Tuesday” by most media accounts. But even with his successes (wins in Virginia, Vermont, Massachusetts, and Idaho, and a decent shot in Alaska), you’ll likely hear some people echo a recent claim by Newt Gingrich: that Romney can’t be confident of the nomination if he can’t win anywhere in the South. This concern didn’t suddenly present itself: Mitt’s first real stumble in the race, of course, was in South Carolina, where he got righteously stomped by Newt.

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This year’s Super Tuesday will be “super” in the most obvious way: Ten states with a total of 437 delegates will make their decisions on the same day. What will be the upshot of all these contests? Below, a guide to what is likely to happen and how to interpret the results: Super Tuesday won’t prove decisive. This is true for two reasons. First, all ten states are using some variant of a proportional system to award delegates. Some are looking to statewide vote totals, while others focus on the results within congressional districts.

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No sooner had Mitt Romney triumphed in the Michigan primary than Rick Santorum edged into his victory by succeeding in winning an equal number of delegates. Romney polled 3 percent higher than Santorum in the popular vote. But that meant nothing in the arcana of counting at the polls that will be translated into 15 delegates each at the Tampa convention in August.

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Ohio Delegates at stake: 66 The Buckeye State is considered by many to be Super Tuesday’s most important prize. Peter Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac Polling Institute, said that Ohio matters so much “because it is so representative of the rest of the country.” A Feb. 27 Quinnipiac poll had Santorum up over Romney 36-29 in the state, but the former Pennsylvania senator failed to qualify for the ballot in three of Ohio’s 16 Congressional districts, which will automatically deny him the nine delegates to be won from those districts.

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GOP Plays Fascist Card

A new way to track the GOP crackup is to count the number of major Republican White House contenders who say that if you don't elect them America will become a fascist country. Amazingly, both Rick Santorum and Ron Paul did it this weekend. As Alec MacGillis notes, on Feb. 19 Santorum told a crowd of 3,000 at a Georgia megachurch, Your country needs you. It’s not as clear a challenge. Obviously, World War II was pretty obvious. At some point, they knew.

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Rick Santorum spent much of last week saying that the media should stop pigeon-holing him as a social-issues culture warrior. Then he spent the weekend saying a whole lot of things that made him sound like ... a social-issues culture warrior. The highlights: 1. At a Tea Party event in Columbus, Santorum said that President Obama is pushing an environmental agenda that is “not about you. It’s not about your quality of life. It’s not about your jobs. It’s about some phony ideal. Some phony theology. Oh, not a theology based on the Bible.

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