Gerald Ford

Correspondence
July 09, 1977

  A disclaimer To the editors: I am very grateful to Henry Fairlie for his generous—too generous—review of my book Hermit of Peking (June 4). What cat would not purr, so deliciously stroked? But I must disclaim one achievement which he ascribes to me. He says that I have "put down" my colleagues A.J.P. Taylor and J.H. Plumb. It is true that once, 20 years ago—in a review of one particular book, The Origins of Ihe Second World War—I expressed dissent from the historical interpretation of Mr. Taylor, whose other works I have invariably praised.

Press Against Politics
November 12, 1976

From The Editors: This week, our historical piece is “Press Against Politics,” Henry Fairlie’s 1976 call to arms for more passion and more conviction from the listless class of political journalists covering the Carter-Ford election. (He was clearly upset: “The fact is that James Reston writes now like a sports columnist on the slope of Olympus.

Ford At The Wire
November 06, 1976

Philadelphia--Six days before the end of this miserable presidential election campaign, Gerald Ford was half through a road trip that had turned out to be fundamentally phony. In glimpses caught on television screens at stops along the Ford route, Jimmy Carter appeared to be cautious to the point of fright and to be justifying the skepticism about him that reporters traveling with him reflected in published accounts and in conversations. A choice between this unimpressive pair being obligatory, I choose Carter.

Being Presidential
July 31, 1976

Gerald Ford, Nelson Rockefeller, and the 1976 Republican nomination.

The Warren Commission In Its Own Words
September 27, 1975

Exactly 11 years ago—on September 27, 1964—the President’s Commission on the Assassination ofPresident John F. Kennedy issued its final report, concluding that Lee Harvey Oswald was the assassin, thathe acted alone rather than as part of a conspiracy, andthat there never had been any link between him and hiskiller. Jack Ruby. After nearly 10 months of intenselabor, however, the Commission, presided over by theChief Justice of the United States, Earl Warren, wasunable to come up with a motive for the Dallasassassination.

Ford's Future
April 13, 1974

Gerald Ford continues to say publicly and in private that he expects to be Vice President and expects Richard Nixon to be President of the United States until January 20, 1977. The Vice President also continues to say that he has no intention of running and no plan to run for the presidency in 1976. But he concluded some weeks ago that it was foolish to go on pretending that there is no possibility that he, the first Vice President who was appointed to the office, may become President by succession before Mr. Nixon’s second term is finished and may be the Republican nominee in 1976.

Nightmares
October 27, 1973

Spiro Agnew's resignation was appropriate and unsurprising.

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