Graphs

Do Readers Give Infographics a Free Pass?

Why we need to learn to scrutinize them like any other journalism

Why we need to learn to scrutinize them like any other journalism

READ MORE >>

Earlier this week, I noted that it was odd for conservatives to be lamenting that the IRS scandal had been allowed to slip away, when in fact they had won this whole round. There had been a huge explosion in coverage in May when the revelations first appeared, nearly all of it making them out to be evidence of a grand Nixonian conspiracy to silence grass-root conservative groups. This explosion in coverage inevitably took its toll on the Obama administration—Obama’s personal approval ratings on characteristics like trust and honesty dropped sharply—and on the IRS, which has not only seen its own standing drop in the polls, but which has seen no shortage of employees disciplined or tarred. Meanwhile, the story has faded from the headlines exactly over the time period when more and more evidence was emerging that the conspiracy wasn’t nearly as grand as first believed—in fact, that there was no conspiracy at all. That is, it has helped conservatives that the media turned away when it did—after the damage had already been done.

READ MORE >>

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR